Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

K'ootz/Khutze Conservancy

About This Conservancy

K’ootz/Khutze Conservancy is located on the east side of Princess Royal Channel, along the Inside Passage route. It shares its northern boundary with Q’altanaas/Aaltanhash Conservancy. Khutze Conservancy protects a very scenic fiord, the entire watershed of the Khutze River, scenic mountains, coastal old-growth forests, high value grizzly bear habitat, salmon spawning streams, marbled murrelets and low-elevation Sitka spruce forests. It also provides a protected anchorage (with scenic waterfalls) adjacent to the main Inside Passage route where visitors can spend a night to rest, fish or watch wildlife.

Conservancy Size:  34,168 ha

Special Notes:
  • There are no roads or trails in this conservancy.
  • This Conservancy is closed to Grizzly Bear hunting.
  • Be bear aware while on shore in this conservancy.
  • The Khutze River is not accessible to small boats further than about 2.5 km up river, due to rapids and rocks.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. K’ootz/Khutze Conservancy is only accessible by boat or floatplane and is located about 65 km southeast of Hartley Bay, 55 km north of Klemtu and 110 km south of Kitimat. It is located along the east side of Princess Royal Channel (Inside Passage route) and east of Princess Royal Island.
  • Reference: Marine Chart #3739 (Swanson Bay to Work Island).
  • Reference: 1:50,000 scale Topographic Maps #103 H/1 (Khutze River) and #103 H/2 (Butedale).
  • Lakelse Douglas Channel area map [PDF 1.87MB]
Kitimat Visitor Information Centre
PO Box 214
2109 Forest Avenue
Kitimat, BC, Canada V8C 2G7
http://www.tourismkitimat.ca/
e-mail: info@tourismkitimat.ca
ph: 250-632-6294 or 1-800-664-6554

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: K’ootz/Khutze Conservancy was designated as a conservancy on July 28, 2006 following recommendations from the Central Coast Land and Resource Management Plan.

    There were two previous mineral claims in the conservancy, up the Khutze River. The “Hunter” claims of 1927 targeted mineralized quartz veins containing copper, gold and silver. Three tonnes were mined yielding 40 kg of copper, 933 grams of gold and 373 grams of silver. The “Western Copper” claims of 1928 targeted mineralized quartz-feldspar veins along a shear zone. The veins contained copper, silver and gold. 215 tonnes were mined yielding 30,812 kg of copper, 45,193 grams of silver and 5,319 grams of gold. Remnants of the old rail grade that was used to bring out the ore can still be seen in the Khutze River estuary.

    There is an old snow cat beside the Khutze River, on the south bank. It is unknown what this piece of abandoned equipment was used for. The UTM coordinates for old snow cat are: Zone 09U; 5881657 m North; 0539879 m East.
  • Cultural Heritage: The conservancy is in the asserted traditional territory of the Gitga’at and Kitasoo First Nations and is an important traditional use area for them. The conservancy contains one known archaeological site (Pre-contact fish trap) and has historically been used for traditional food gathering, fishing and trapping by local First Nations.
    Use the below link for more information or to contact these First Nations.
  • Conservation: The conservancy protects an area of popular recreational use by boaters, the Khutze and East Khutze River watersheds and several small remote streams, lakes and wetlands. The conservancy also protects old-growth forests of red cedar, hemlock and spruce as well as coastal wildlife habitat including important salmon spawning streams and habitat for grizzly bears.
  • Wildlife: Grizzly Bears, wolves, waterfowl, eagles, spawning salmon and deer can be seen in the conservancy. The best place to see wildlife is at the river mouth and estuary at the end of Khutze Inlet. Humpback whales, killer whales, Dall’s porpoises, Pacific white-sided dolphins, sea lions and harbour seals can also be seen in the adjacent marine waters.
  • General Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • An online management plan is not available for this conservancy.
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Activities Available at this Conservancy

Canoeing

Canoeing

Adventurous and experienced kayakers may enjoy exploring the inlet, bays and shorelines in this conservancy.
Fishing

Fishing

There are opportunities to fish for trout and salmon in Khutze River. Please consult the appropriate non-tidal fishing regulations for more information. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate license.
Hunting

Hunting

This Conservancy is open to hunting during lawful hunting seasons but is closed to Grizzly Bear hunting. Please check the BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving

It is possible to SCUBA dive or snorkel in the conservancy. The water clarity is best during winter and spring.
Swimming

Swimming

Swimming is possible in the ocean, but the water is cold all year round. There are no lifeguards on duty in the conservancy.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

Grizzly Bears, wolves, waterfowl, eagles, spawning salmon and deer can be seen in the conservancy. The best place to see wildlife is at the river mouth and estuary at the end of Khutze Inlet. Humpback whales, killer whales, Dall’s porpoises, Pacific white-sided dolphins, sea lions and harbour seals can also be seen in the adjacent marine waters.
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Facilities Available at this Conservancy

Campfires

Campfires

Firewood is not provided. If you must have a fire, please burn only dead and down wood, and be sure to fully extinguish the fire when done. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil so please use it conservatively, if at all. We encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of campfires and using camp stoves instead. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented during extremely hot weather conditions.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed but no facilities are provided. Reservations are not accepted at this conservancy and all sites are on a first-come, first-served basis.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

There are winter camping opportunities in this conservancy, as it can be accessed year round.