In This Conservancy

Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Conservancy Contact

BC Parks
250 651-7634
Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Smoking is prohibited
During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin.

Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy

About This Conservancy

Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy is located immediately east of the town of Atlin and is culturally significant to the Taku River Tlingit First Nation. It is highly valued by local residents for its natural, historical, and recreational values. The traditional Tlingit A Xéegi Deiyi, or shoulder mountain trail, extends from the beach on the Atlin Lake shoreline to the small lakes at the top of Monarch Mountain.
Date Established: June 22, 2012
Conservancy Size: 424 hectares

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

Nature and Culture

  • History: Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy was established on July 6, 2012, following the recommendations of the Wóoshtin wudidaa/Atlin Taku Land Use Plan (Wóoshtin wudidaa). The Wóoshtin wudidaa was adopted by a Taku River Tlingit First Nation Joint Clan Resolution and jointly approved by the Province and the Taku River Tlingit First Nation in July 2011. The conservancy is named and described in Schedule E of the Protected Areas of British Columbia Act.

  • Cultural Heritage: Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy lies within the traditional territory of the Taku River Tlingit First Nation. The Tlingit name “A Xéegi Deiyi” (pronounced “A-hee-ged day”) means the shoulder trail, which extends from the beach on Atlin Lake shoreline to the small lakes at the top of Monarch Mountain. According to Elder Jackie Williams, the rock outcropping is called shoulder rock because the shoulder is a strong part of the body, and this trail is a strong and powerful journey for people seeking healing and wellness. It is important to respect the privacy of people who travel to the two small lakes on the summit plateau for spiritual activities.

    Three archaeological sites at the base of the “A Xéegi Deiyi” trail found just outside of the conservancy boundary highlight the significance of the area. These sites are at the mouth of Pine Creek (a key grayling gathering place) and are important spiritual sites for prayer and cleansing ceremonies. In addition to the trail and archaeological sites, documented Tlingit traditional uses include berry picking, hunting and trapping.

  • Conservation: Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy lies within the Yukon Southern Lakes Ecoregion. This ecoregion is characterized by a gently rolling upland, with wide valleys separating isolated mountains. In the past, this area was largely covered by glaciers that moved northward off the Boundary Ranges to the southwest where they came into contact with glaciers from the Skeena Mountains.

    The dominant ecosystem in the Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy is the spruce-willow-birch shrublands. An area of Boreal White and Black Spruce also occurs on the lower slopes on the western side of the conservancy.

  • Wildlife: Wildlife diversity in the Monarch Mountain/A Xéegi Deiyi Conservancy is limited by the harsh climate typical of the spruce-willow-birch ecosystem. These high elevation plateaus are not highly used in winter. However, a large variety of wildlife species, including ungulates, large carnivores, small mammals, raptors, song birds, and a host of invertebrate species, use the area in the snow-free months.

  • Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information

Management Planning

Activities Available at this Conservancy

Hiking

Hiking

There is a 5.3km long hiking trail that originates near Atlin Lake and leads to the summit of Monarch Mountain, where one will find incredible views on a clear day. The trailhead is marked at a pull-out 3.7km down Warm Bay Road. The Monarch Mountain Trail is the most popular and widely-used trail in the Atlin region. Please respect the privacy of people using the two small lakes on the summit plateau for spiritual activities by giving them plenty of space.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is allowed in the conservancy. All hunters to the area should refer to the current BC Hunting & Trapping Regulations Synopsis for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash and under control at all times. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

A variety of birds and mammals may be seen in the park during the summer months.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

The trail to the summit is often used for snowshoeing in the winter.