Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information

Beaching of boats can be difficult at the north end of Anstey Arm. The water in front of the sandy beaches on the north shore is shallow, especially in late summer. Boaters should approach with caution and be prepared to wade to the beach. On the west side of the arm where the Hunakwa Lake trail begins, the shoreline is rocky. Only small boats are able to beach (with caution).

Most of the park, including Hunakwa Lake, is remote with no facilities.  Bring your own drinking water, as potable water is not available in the park.

Park Contact This park proudly operated by:
Silvertip Park Services Ltd.
E-mail: parkinquiries@telus.net
Phone: 250 320-9305

Anstey Hunakwa Provincial Park

About This Park

Anstey Hunakwa Provincial Park Anstey Hunakwa Provincial Park includes a variety of landscapes at the north end of Shuswap Lake. It extends from the shore of the lake to alpine environments on mountain tops.

There are extensive areas of old-growth forest in the Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir and Interior Cedar-Hemlock zones. Included in the park are two lakes that cannot be reached by road (a rarity in the Shuswap area) – Hunakwa Lake and Wright Lake.

The north end of Anstey Arm is more accessible (but only by boat), and is valued for its recreational opportunities (sandy beaches) and salmon habitat.

Park Size: 6,852 hectares
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The main access to the park is by boat to the north end of Anstey Arm on Shuswap Lake. There is a 3 km trail from the north end of Anstey Arm to the south end of Hunakwa Lake.

The closest communities, towns and cities are Seymour Arm, Anglemont, Celista, Scotch Creek, Blind Bay, Eagle Bay, Sicamous, Mara Lake, Tappen, Sorrento and Salmon Arm.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: This protected area was recommended through the Okanagan-Shuswap Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP) process and formally established as a Class A Park on April 18th, 2001, through Order-in Council under the Protected Areas of British Columbia Act.
  • Cultural Heritage: Some parts of the park are believed to have been used by First Nations. Details are not available.
  • Conservation: Steep forested slopes rise from Shuswap Lake and Hunakwa Lake to the alpine. Includes the most extensive undisturbed Interior Cedar Hemlock moist-warm Variant 3 (ICHmw3 - biogeoclimactic zones) in the region. The park has high biological diversity with a mix of successional forests including abundant deciduous-conifer stands in the ICH zone and a riparian floodplain with wetlands between Anstey Arm and Hunakwa Lake.
  • Wildlife: The habitat of grizzly, black bear, moose, mule deer, pine marten, Townsend’s big-eared bat and fisher are found within the park. It is also the spawning grounds for lake char, sockeye salmon, coho salmon, kokanee and rainbow trout.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are opportunities for canoeing or kayaking in this park. Your water craft must be portaged to Hunakwa Lake Trail (approximately 3 km). Be prepared for rough and wet conditions. There is no vehicle access.
Fishing

Fishing

At the present time we have no details on fish in Hunakwa and Wright lakes in the protected area. Shuswap Lake contains 19 species of fish and year round fishing. Lake trout and Rainbows to 10 kg. Bull trout, Kokanee, Burbot, Whitefish. Mainly trolling for deep lurkers is the most popular technique. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure. Hunakwa Lake Trail is 3 km – Be prepared for rough and wet conditions.
Hunting

Hunting

This Park is open to hunting. Please consult the Hunting and Trapping Information for more information.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted, but firewood is not available. Firewood may be purchases from vendors on Shuswap Lake or you can bring your own wood. While campfires are allowed and campfire rings are provided at each campsite, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided and visitors are expected to practice “no trace” camping. Boat accessible camping facilities are available at Shuswap Lake Marine Park (Anstey Beach and Four Mile Creek sites).
Marine Access Camping Fee: $20.00 per vessel / night
Marine Access Camping Annual Fee: $600.00 per vessel / year