Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].

In This Park

Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Visitor Information

Potential human/bear conflicts. This area is excellent black and grizzly bear habitat. Users of the area must be knowledgeable about wilderness travel and the necessary precautions. See the general visitor safety information below.

Bring your own drinking water, as potable water is not available in the park.

Arctic Pacific Lakes Provincial Park

Important Notice Attention Visitors – Important Notice!

  • May 17, 2017: Road access to the canoe launch area at the upper Parsnip River Bridge
    Road access to the canoe launch area at the upper Parsnip River Bridge on The Chuchinka-Arctic Forest Service Road from 73km to 82km is quite overgrown with willow and alder. The road is down to one lane in spots due to the brushing in of the road. Use caution while crossing any of the road bridges on the way in due to some rotten decking.

About This Park

Arctic Pacific Lakes Provincial ParkPhotoGallery
The main feature of the 13,887 hectare park is three small lakes that straddle the Continental Divide in a narrow, steep-sided glacial overflow channel. Arctic Lake is located in the headwaters of the Parsnip River that eventually drains into the Arctic Ocean. Portage and Pacific Lakes drain via James Creek into Herrick Creek and the McGregor River, which empties into the Fraser River on the way to the Pacific. This is a unique watershed as water flows to the Pacific and also to the Arctic Ocean.

The lakes are a beautiful turquoise colour, and situated in a very scenic area, with alpine peaks and ridges as a distant backdrop. Situated in an area of limestone bedrock, some watercourses drain underground. Valley bottoms alongside the lakes support wet meadows and mixed forest. Valley sides include extensive avalanche chutes and small, picturesque waterfalls.

The park protects very high value fall and spring grizzly habitat, and year-round caribou habitat. Lakes and streams support diverse fish populations, and provide excellent opportunities for fishing. Diverse fish populations including lake trout, bull trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, dolly varden, mountain whitefish, redside shiner, lake char, and chinook salmon, and arctic grayling in Arctic Lake.

This protected area contains an old aboriginal route that was followed by Alexander Mackenzie in 1793 during the first crossing of the continent to the Pacific Ocean.

Established Date: June 29, 2000

Park Size: 13,887 hectares

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. This protected area is located in a remote area 90 km Northeast of Prince George. A logging road in the Parsnip Valley provides access to within a short distance of the park, boat access is also possible via the Parsnip River and Arctic Creek. The closest community, town and city is Prince George.

Nature and Culture

  • History: This protected area contains an old aboriginal route that was followed by Alexander Mackenzie in 1793 during the first crossing of the continent to the Pacific Ocean.
  • Cultural Heritage: Archaeological sites are found around Arctic Lake. This area is used by the McLeod Lake Indian Band for berry picking, hunting, and fishing.
  • Wildlife: Very high fall and spring grizzly populations and year round caribou habitat. Diverse fish populations including lake trout, bull trout, rainbow trout, kokanee, Dolly Varden, mountain whitefish, redside shiner, lake char, and chinook salmon, and Arctic Grayling in Arctic Lake.

Management Planning

  • Management Planning Information
  • There is currently no approved valid management plan for this area. Management plans are prepared as soon as practicable, subject to available resources and the ability of key planning partners to participate.

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are opportunities for canoeing or kayaking in this park. Access to Arctic Lake via the Parsnip River and Arctic Creek is possible. The route down James Creek is not recommended due to the many log jams and rapids.
Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence. See BC Freshwater Fishing Regulations synopsis for site specific regulations.
Hiking

Hiking

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure. The only trail is the historic Portage trail between Arctic and Pacific Lakes. Very rugged terrain.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is allowed in the park. See the Hunting and Trapping regulations for more information. Horses are not allowed in the park for hunting purposes.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks. Lakes are extremely cold due to elevation and short season.

Facilities Available at this Park

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided. Rugged terrain with no facilities or trails other than the trail between Arctic and Pacific Lakes, extremely difficult foot access, main access by boat via the Parsnip River and Arctic Creek.