Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information

Wood ticks are most prevalent between March and June. These parasites reside in tall grass and low shrubbery and seek out warm-blooded hosts. Although they are potential carriers of disease, they are a natural part of the environment and can be easily avoided. Your legs should be protected by wearing trousers tucked into socks or gaiters. After outdoor activity, thoroughly examine yourself. Check your pets for ticks as well.

Arrowstone Provincial Park

About This Park

Arrowstone Provincial Park

Arrowstone Provincial Park is a wilderness area and protects one of the largest undisturbed valleys in the dry southern interior and also contains large stands of old growth Douglas fir. There are no camping or day-use facilities provided. The park allows hiking in a relatively pristine environment that is remote, yet is accessible to a major highway. A forestry road follows a section of the park’s boundary, providing opportunities to enter the park from various locations. Backcountry camping, nature appreciation, wildlife viewing, photography and hunting opportunities also exist in the park.

Park Size: 6,203 hectares

Special Notes:

This is a wild area: be completely self-sufficient, bring adequate drinking water and supplies.

No off-road vehicle travel is permitted in Arrowstone Provincial Park.

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Location and Maps

Northeast of Cache Creek in the Thompson River Basin, the area is accessed via Battle Creek Forest Road or via the Back Valley road from Deadman Valley to Cache Creek.

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Nature and Culture

  • History - The park was created on April 30, 1996 as a result of recommendations made in the Kamloops Land and Resource Management Plan. The park will be managed according to the Management Direction Statement for Arrowstone Protected Area.
  • Cultural Heritage - A regionally important aboriginal basalt quarry at the junction of Arrowstone and Cache Creeks is included in the park, along with many archaeological sites in the park's southwest portion. The area also contains archaeological values and was historically used for hunting and food gathering by First Nations. The area is linked to the historic Gang Ranch and the present Perry Ranch.
  • Conservation - The park protects one of the largest undisturbed watersheds in the dry southern interior. The park includes old-growth Douglas-fir forest, along with a representation of grasslands. Critical winter range for mule deer and rare species including burrowing owls, falcons and the western rattlesnake are secured and protected.
  • Wildlife - Wildlife is potentially dangerous and may be encountered at any time. Never approach or feed any wild animal. Make your presence known when hiking. Cache your food properly.
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Activities Available at this Park

Fishing

Fishing

Fishing opportunities for brook trout are at Tsotin Lake. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is permitted only during lawful game hunting season. Check the Hunting and Trapping regulations for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

Depending on snow levels and vehicle access, there are snowshoeing opportunities. Snowmobiling is not allowed
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Facilities Available at this Park

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

There are no developed or designated camping areas in this park. Backpackers need to practice no impact camping. This area is entirely user-maintained.