In This Park

Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Park Contact

BC Parks
250-651-7634
Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Smoking is prohibited
During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin.

Atlin/Téix’gi Aan Tlein Provincial Park

Important Notice Attention Visitors – Important Notice! Show/hide public advisories

Snowmobiling is allowed on Atlin Lake only
Beyond Atlin Lake, snowmobile use is prohibited and considered to be an offence under the Park, Conservancy and Recreation Area Regulation. Generally, the activity of snowmobiling is prohibited in most provincial parks.

About This Park

Atlin/Téix’gi Aan Tlein Provincial ParkPhotoGallery

The remoteness of the park, combined with the varied topography, offers exceptional outdoor holiday opportunities. Those that travel in this park should be experienced and well equipped. There are no supplies of any sort and no park personnel in the immediate area.

Recent additions to the park encompass the eastern side of Atlin Mountain, the Atlin River, a portion of the south shoreline of Graham Inlet and a portion of area in the upper Willison Creek area. Atlin Mountain is a landmark viewscape from the town of Atlin. The additions have high cultural, recreational and wilderness values for the Taku River Tlingit First Nation and the local community.

Visitors cannot access the park by vehicle. Visitors planning to enter the park must do so by boat or aircraft.

Established Date: May 18, 1973
Park Size: 229,894 hectares.

Special Notes

  • The climate patterns of the area are continental, with cold, long winters and warm summers. Stormy weather can linger in the valley for long periods. Temperatures decrease with increasing elevation. Because of latitude, Atlin/Téix’gi Aan Tlein Provincial Park has very short days in the winter, but by the June solstice there is no actual darkness at night.

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Located in the northwest corner of the province, chartered access is available in the town of Atlin located along highway #7 from Jake’s Corner on the Alaska highway. Visitors cannot access the park by vehicle. Visitors planning to enter the park must do so by boat or aircraft.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

Nature and Culture

  • History: Atlin is a corruption of “Ah-lah”, a native word meaning stormy weather. Atlin/Téix’gi Aan Tlein Provincial Park is occupied by approximately one third glaciers, Llewellyn Glacier being the most prominent.
  • Cultural Heritage:The area has been used by the Taku River Tlinget for many years. There are severalarcheological sites and cultural sites within the park. It was gold that gave Atlin its reason for existence. Hordes of prospectors poured into Alaska and the Yukon during 1898 spurred by a number of rich strikes. Many of these became weary of travel and were lured aside to discoveries that were easier to reach. The gold rush came to Atlin Lake country in 1898 and was one of the richest offshoots of the klondike rush. By the end of the mining season of 1899 about 5000 people flocked to the region, and Atlin was a busy and important town. Although creeks in the present day park must have been prospected, none bore any gold. Although production was greatest in the early years, the Atlin field still produces today. Total placer gold production has exceeded $23,000,000 making it second only to the Cariboo in the history of British Columbia.
  • Conservation: Atlin/Téix’gi Aan Tlein Provincial Park contains three important ecosections - Teslin Plateau, Tagish-Highlands, Boundary Ranges (only partial representation for all three). It also contains Lake Trout Fishery which is internationally significant.
  • Wildlife: This environment provides exceptional habitat for grizzly and black bear, mountain goat, caribou, moose, stone sheep, and various wolf population. There are many small animals such as the hoary marmot, Arctic ground squirrel, picas, beaver and the otter. Birds also inhabitant the park area. The most obvious birds are the various gulls, and the Arctic tern, there are also blue-grouse, ruffed-grouse and the rock, willow and white-tailed ptarmigan that have been spotted near the upland.

Management Planning

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Kayaking and canoeing are popular on Atlin Lake, and commercial tours are available. Use caution as the lake is prone to strong winds producing large waves.
Fishing

Fishing

The waters of Atlin Lake contain lake trout, Arctic grayling, Dolly Varden and two species of white fish. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are four main hiking trails in the park:
  • Google Earth KMZ File of the Altlin Park Trails, must have Google Earth and/or and Google Maps
    • One trail begins in Llewellyn Inlet and leads to a knoll that provides good views of the Llewellyn Glacier. This is an 800 m long trail with 55 m of elevation gain to the viewpoint. It is possible to continue beyond the viewpoint, but the trail is not maintained.
    • The Mt. Adams Trail starts in Sloko Inlet and climbs 170 m over its 4.5 km length. The trail leads to a glacial lake at the base of the spectacular Llewellyn Glacier.
    • The start of the Sloko Lake Trail is also located in Sloko Inlet. This 2 km trail has 145 m of elevation gain and takes you to the shores of Sloko Lake.
    • The Shortest Railway Trail is an easy 4 km walk along an abandoned rail line, known as the Taku Tram, from Scotia Bay on Atlin Lake to the historic buildings of Taku Landing on Tagish Lake.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is allowed in the park. All hunters to the area should refer to the current BC Hunting and Trapping Regulation synopsis for more information.
Swimming

Swimming

Swimming is possible but the water is very cool. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

There are winter recreation opportunities available in the park. Snowmobiling is allowed on Atlin Lake within the park. Beyond Atlin Lake, snowmobile use is prohibited and considered to be an offence under the Park, Conservancy and Recreation Area Regulation. Generally, the activity of snowmobiling is prohibited in most provincial parks.

Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted within this park using the fire pits at the designated campsites.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit toilets are located at camping locations noted on the park map.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness camping is the only source available. You are asked to use “no trace” camping techniques.