Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Bearhole Lake Provincial Park and Protected Area

About This Park

Bearhole Lake Provincial Park and Protected Area

Fishing, cross-country skiing, canoeing, camping, hiking, and wildlife viewing are just some of the outdoor pursuits that can all be enjoyed in Bearhole Lake Provincial Park and Protected Area.

The area teems with wildlife. Watch moose wade through the marsh and lake shallows or observe beaver busily chewing bark off of willow or aspen twigs. Bird enthusiasts will enjoy seeing nesting trumpeter swans or listening to many of the warblers found in and around the area.

Whatever you choose, this clear water lake definitely has a lot to offer.  

Park Size: 17460 hectares

Special Notes:

  • Trumpeter swans are easily disturbed during the nesting period. Please do not approach these elegant birds or their young during this critical time

Reservations

For parks that accept reservations, all vehicle accessible campsites (with the exception of
group sites) must be reserved through Discover Camping.

Explore Parks: Fees, park listings, what you should know before you go and other useful links.

Back to Top

Location and Maps

Bearhole Lake Provincial Park and Protected Area is located 25 km east of Tumbler Ridge on the Alberta Plateau. Access is via 20 km west along the Kiskatinaw Forest Service Road You can access the Forestry Road from the Heritage Highway. Please note: The Forestry Road is not usually maintained and becomes rutted and slippery after rains. Caution advised.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

Back to Top

Nature and Culture

  • Cultural Heritage - Area of traditional use by First Nations of the Treaty 8 Tribal Association.
  • Conservation - Trumpeter swans find critical nesting habitat in and around Bearhole Lake. The area surrounding the lake contains undisturbed boreal white and black spruce forests and wetlands typical of the Kiskatinaw Plateau ecosection. The headwaters of the Kiskatinaw River are within the boundaries of the park and protected area. Low elevation caribou, moose and white-tailed deer find important winter range within the park and protected area.
  • Wildlife (specific to this park or area) - The lake contains yellow perch, burbot, rainbow trout, northern pike, large-scale sucker, and white sucker. Trumpeter swans use the lake and surrounding marsh to nest and fledge their young. Moose, caribou, black bear, white-tailed deer and numerous small mammals and birds all reside in the park and protected area.
Back to Top

Management Planning

Management Planning Information

  • There are no online planning documents available for this park and protected area.
Back to Top

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are opportunities for canoeing or kayaking in this park.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycling is permitted in the park. Helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are no developed trails at this park but visitors can explore the area. Always be prepared when venturing out in the backcountry/wilderness area.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Horseback riding is permitted.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. All hunters to the area should refer to the current BC Hunting and Trapping Regulation synopsis for more information. .
Swimming

Swimming

There are swimming opportunities in the park.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are wildlife viewing opportunities.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

There are snowshoeing and backcountry skiing opportunities in the park.
Back to Top

Facilities Available at this Park

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

There is a boat launch in the park.
Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don't gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented and some parks may use communal fire rings. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

There is a day-use area and picnic facilities in the park.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

There are pit toilets in this park.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

There are vehicle accessible camping facilities at this park.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.