Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Big Creek Provincial Park

Know Before You Go

Read visitor etiquitte information before visiting this protected area [PDF 12KB]

If you have visited Big Creek Provincial Park, we would appreciate if you could please complete an on-line comment form. This will allow park managers to obtain valuable information from those who have experienced the area.
NOTE:  This form is not for providing input to the management planning process.

Stay Safe

  • This Park is not regularly patrolled. Visitors should be totally self-sufficient.
  • Visitors should ensure they make their presence known if there are signs of bear and food should be properly cached.
  • In some locations of the park, you will be several days from any form of help. Bring a good first aid kit and exercise caution.
  • Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the protected area. Water is available from the areas numerous lakes, streams and creeks. Visitors should filter, boil or treat the water prior to consuming.

About This Park

Big Creek Provincial ParkPhotoGallery
The park’s landscapes vary from dramatic mountains and alpine lakes in the south, to gentler volcanic hills and lava formations, to the flat, forested Chilcotin Plateau in the north.

The spectacular scenery in the south makes it a popular destination for horseback riding, backpacking, hunting, wildlife viewing, and mountaineering. Because of the park’s remoteness, visitors must be experienced in backcountry travel and completely self-sufficient.

This park teems with wildlife; you might see mountain goats, California bighorn sheep, moose or predators such as wolves, black and grizzly bears. Please do not stress them by approaching closely.

Established Date: July 12, 1995

Park Size: 67,918 hectares
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Although Big Creek Park is located only 100 km south-west of Williams Lake as the crow flies, there is no road access to the park boundary. Two routes link to trails into the park. They follow logging roads, so watch for industrial traffic and use headlights. Roads become very slippery when wet: four-wheel drive, shovel and tire chains are recommended.

Southern route:
To access hiking and horse trails at Relay Creek and Tyaughton Creek: drive approximately 69km on Carpenter Lake Road west of Lillooet. Turn right on Marshall Lake Road. Zero odometer here. Stay left at 3km. At 11.6km, stay right on to the Mud Creek Main Road.14.8km, cross bridge. 17.5km, stay left. 24.5km, stay left. 25.6km, cross bridge. 29.6km, stay right. 36km, cross bridge. 36.8km, stay right. 41.2km, turn left onto the Mud Creek – Paradise Creek Road. Drive down the hill to 43km, Tyaughton Creek Forest Recreation Site. Turn right just past the recreation site. Do not take trailers onto this road. This road is not maintained and may be washed out at any point, proceed with caution. 52.7km, stay left. 54.3km, stay left. 54.9km, stay left. 57.2km, stay left. 57.7km, cross small creek at the edge of a logging landing. It is not recommended taking 2 wheel drive vehicles beyond this point. 64.7km, stay left. 65km, drive past the old mining camp. 66.3km, Relay Creek Forest Service Recreation Site.

Northern route:
Few park visitors use this access. However, there is a rough trail that parallels Big Creek, and which is best suited for horseback riding. Follow the logging road (2000 road) that leaves Highway 20 at Riske Creek. Travel to approximately 51km, turn left onto the 2400 road. Stay on this road until you reach a green gate. Park here, follow the road approximately 2.5km past the gate, turn right and follow the old road/trail to Lorna Lake and the Dil-Dil Plateau.

Maps:
1:50,000 topographic maps of the park are available at most map retailers: 92-O/2, 92-O/3, 92-O/6, and 92-O/7.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Cycling

Cycling

Cycling is permitted. The terrain is suited to exploration by mountain bike, but you must stay on existing trails. Do not be tempted to venture off trail, as you can cause long-term damage to this unique ecosystem. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

Fish for rainbow trout in Lorna Lake or Big Creek. It is not an exceptional fishery, as the water is cloudy. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

Owing to the area’s extensive history of recreational use, there is a large network of unmaintained trails. Hiking and horse trails may be used to access the park via Relay Creek and Tyaughton Creek. Trails are unmarked and usually very wet.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Big Creek Park is a popular destination for horseback riding, but because of the park’s remoteness, visitors must be experienced in backcountry travel and completely self-sufficient. Please use only weed-free pelleted feed for horses, since import of weeds is a major concern in the Protected Area.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. All hunters to the area should refer to the current BC Hunting Regulation synopsis.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

If you must bring your dog to Big Creek Park, it must be under control at all times. It is illegal to allow your dog to harass wildlife or livestock. You are responsible for its behaviour and must dispose of its excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted. However, no firewood is provided. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry and walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.