Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information Stay Safe: There are steep cliffs at this park. Please do not climb over the chain link fence. Watch children closely. Fences are provided only near the parking area and lookout. Hike at your own risk.

Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.
Park Contact This park proudly operated by:
Shuswap Adams Parks Ltd.
E-mail: parkinquiries@telus.net
Phone: 250 320-9305

Chasm Provincial Park

About This Park

Chasm Provincial Park The park conserves forests of ponderosa pine at the northern limit of its range, and diverse low elevation lakes and marshes. The uplands, marshes, and lakes are rich ecosystems supporting abundant wildlife.

A spectacular display of colour illustrates the park’s rich geology in the Chasm Creek Valley and part of the Bonaparte River Valley. Successive lava flows form layers in varying tones of red, brown, yellow and purple, which have been revealed in the steep lava-layered canyon walls through erosion over the past 10 million years.

At the end of the last ice age, 10,000 years ago, water from the melting glaciers carried so much silt that it carved the 8 km long, 600-metre wide and 300-metre deep Chasm. An esker (ridge of gravel) formed by the glacier stretches 40 km upstream, northwest from the head of the Chasm.

Chasm Provincial Park protects the unique river canyon of the Chasm Creek Valley and part of the Bonaparte River Valley. In 1995, the park was recommended for expansion through the Cariboo Chilcotin Land-Use Plan. It was enlarged from 141 hectares to 3067 hectares to protect more of the area’s colourful geological formations and ponderosa pine forests. The unique features of Chasm Provincial Park offer hiking opportunities and spectacular backdrops for the avid photographer.

Facilities include a pull out viewing area and a larger parking area with a toilet.

Park Size: 3,067 hectares
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Location and Maps

Please Note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The park is located along Chasm Creek. It can be accessed by taking Highway 97 to 16 km north of Clinton, and then driving 4 km to the park on a paved road east of Highway 97. It can also be accessed from further north off Highway 97 about 15 km southwest of 70 Mile House. Please refer to the Cariboo Forest Region Recreation Map (East) published by the Ministry of Forests for more information. Topographical map number 1:50,000 92P/3 shows land contours in detail. The closest communities, towns and cities are 70 Mile House, 100 Mile House and Clinton.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: This park was established in 1940 to protect the Painted Chasm. In 1995, the park was recommended for expansion through the Cariboo Chilcotin Land-Use Plan. It was enlarged from 141 hectares to 3067 hectares to protect more of the area’s colourful geological formations and ponderosa pine forests. At the end of the last ice age, 10,000 years ago, water from the melting glaciers carried so much silt that it carved the 8 km long, 600 m wide and 300 m deep Chasm. An esker (ridge of gravel) formed by the glacier stretches 40 km upstream, northwest from the head of the Chasm. Layers of volcanic lava can be distinguished in the steep canyon walls.
  • Conservation: Chasm Provincial Park protects a lava-layered canyon formed by glacial melt water erosion. The park also conserves forests of ponderosa pine at the northern limit of its range, and diverse low elevation lakes and marshes. The uplands, marshes, and lakes are rich ecosystems supporting abundant wildlife.
  • Wildlife: Bighorn sheep inhabit the steep wall of the canyon. Moose, mule deer, black bear, coyote, small mammals, songbirds and birds of prey inhabit this area.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Online Management planning information for this park is not available at this time.
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Activities Available at this Park

Cycling

Cycling

Cycling is permitted. Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Hiking

Hiking

This park has informal hiking trails (generally following old roads – there are no signs to mark the routes). An old road, which leads along the southern edge of the chasm, offers occasional spectacular views and a very pleasant experience of dry pine and fir forest. There are steep cliffs at this park. Watch children closely. Fences are provided only near the parking area and lookout. Hike at your own risk.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

There are horseback riding opportunities in this park.
Hunting

Hunting

This park is open to hunting. Please consult the Hunting and Trapping regulations for more information.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There is a viewpoint. The view is of a spectacular display of colour which illustrates the park’s rich geology in the Chasm Creek Valley and part of the Bonaparte River Valley. Successive lava flows form layers in varying tones of red, brown, yellow and purple, which have been revealed in the steep lava-layered canyon walls through erosion over the past 10 million years.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

There is a viewpoint and parking area for day-use activities, but no developed picnic area. The view is a spectacular display of colour illustrating the park’s rich geology in the Chasm Creek Valley and part of the Bonaparte River Valley. Successive lava flows form layers in varying tones of red, brown, yellow and purple, which have been revealed in the steep lava-layered canyon walls through erosion over the past 10 million years.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park has pit toilets – no flush toilets.