Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information Bring your own drinking water, as potable water is not available in this park.

Dawley Passage Provincial Park

About This Park

Dawley Passage Provincial Park is located at the south end of Fortune Channel between Meares Island and the west coast of Vancouver Island. Accessible by boat only, Dawley Passage is a nice, quiet location for boaters exploring beautiful Clayoquot Sound. Strong currents in the tidal narrows of Dawley Passage result in a high density and a magnificent diversity of marine life, making it a great area for scuba diving.

Fortune Channel is one of Clayoquot Sound’s most popular tourism corridors, and opportunities exist in and around the park for fishing, boating and wilderness camping. The sheltered waters around Dawley Passage make it a popular spot for canoeing and kayaking. Paddlers in the area may see seals and sea otters in their travels, as well as bears feeding at low tide. The park also contains a number of Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations heritage sites.

Park Size: 154 hectares (62 ha upland and 92 ha foreshore)
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The park is located at the south end of Fortune Channel between Meares Island and the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dawley Passage Park is accessible by boat only. Boaters can reference marine chart #3673 for more information about this area. Nearby communties include Tofino and Ucluelet.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • Cultural Heritage - Dawley Passage lies within the traditional territory of the Ahoushat First Nations.
  • Conservation - An exceptional marine ecosystem and marine features can be found in Dawley Passage, which has strong currents and tidal rapids. These features result in a high density and diversity of marine species.
  • General Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

The sheltered waters around Dawley Passage make it a popular spot for canoeing and kayaking. Paddlers in the area may see seals and sea otters in their travels, as well as bears feeding at low tide. Visitors can paddle from Tofino through Browning Passage to reach Dawley Passage, or from the Grice Bay boat launch in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Kayak rentals are available from a number of kayak companies in Tofino and Ucluelet.
Fishing

Fishing

The waters of Clayoquot Sound may contain a variety of fish species, including salmon, rockfish, halibut and lingcod. Fishing is permitted as per provincial and federal fishing regulations. All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hunting

Hunting

Portions of this park are open to hunting for specific species. Hunters must have valid licences and tags. Please refer to current printed Hunting and Trapping Regulations and Synopsis publication for closures and regulations.
Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving

Strong currents in the tidal narrows of Dawley Passage result in a high density and a magnificent diversity of marine life, which makes for interesting scuba diving opportunities.
Swimming

Swimming

Ocean swimming. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

While small fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. If you do have a fire, please utilize previously constructed fire rings and use small pieces of wood that will burn completely. If you can't find a previously used site, try to construct your fire rings below the high tide mark. Never leave your fire unattended and practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

There are no designated campsites at this park, however random wilderness camping is permitted year-round. No facilities are provided and there is no fee. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

There are no designated campsites at this park, however random wilderness camping is permitted year-round. No facilities are provided and there is no fee. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.