This park is currently closed due to fire hazard.
Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF].

In This Park

Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park

About This Park

Established in June of 1999, Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park surrounds Finger and Tatuk Lakes and extends south to include the smaller Turff, Vance, Cory, Bodley, and Harp Lakes south of the Tatuk Hills. Special Feature: Beautiful series of lakes and regionally significant recreational destination.

Abundant populations of rainbow trout and kokanee are the main attraction for anglers in the area. Guided and resident hunting and boating are also popular pursuits. Diverse and high-value habitat in the park provides for a range of animal species including grizzly and black bear, ungulates, small fur-bearers, waterfowl, shore-birds, and eagles.

There are two resorts within the park. Finger Lake Wilderness Resort is located at the west-end of Finger Lake. Tatuk Lake Outfitters & Wilderness Resort can be found on the northwest shore of Tatuk lake.

Park Size: 17,151 hectares

Stay Safe:

  • Potable water is not available in the park, but is available at the resorts.  BC Parks suggests you bring your own water, or you may obtain drinking water from the nearby resorts.

  • Be advised that to get to Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park you must use active forest service roads. Please be alert for industrial traffic and drive at a safe speed with your headlights on.

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park is located 80 kilometres south of Vanderhoof and 115 km southwest of Prince George. Map reference: 93F/8 & 93 F/9

To access Finger Lake and the west end of Tatuk Lake, use the Kluskus forest service road near Vanderhoof. Access to the east end of Tatuk Lake is via the Pelican (Prince George) or Bobtail (Highway #16) Forest Service Roads.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

Nature and Culture

  • History - The Finger-Tatuk area was first identified as a potential protected area in 1994. The park was legislated in June of 1999, following the recommendations of the Vanderhoof Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP).
  • Cultural Heritage - The area around Finger and Tatuk Lakes was heavily used in earlier times by various Carrier First Nations. Food cache pits, culturally altered trees, traditional trails, and lodge or “kickwillie” depressions have been documented within the park. A village site near Tatuk Lake was the subject of an archaeological dig in the 1970s. In the early 1900s, the area was sporadically populated by trappers, ranchers and fur-farmers. The Batnuni Wagon Trail ran through the southeast part of the park connecting to the Meridian road. The Frontier Cattle Company drove their herds from the Home Ranch through this area, which Rich Hobson's books later documented. All natural and cultural resources are protected in the park. Damage to, collection or removal of any natural resource or cultural artifact is prohibited.
  • Conservation - Finger-Tatuk Provincial Park protects one of the best representations of sub-boreal spruce and Englemann spruce/sub-alpine fir within the Nazko Upland. The area also contributes to the maintenance of local and provincial biological diversity. A wide range of lake sizes across a landscape interconnected by wetland riparian corridors provides important wildlife habitat features. The kokanee run each fall in Finger Creek is regionally significant.
  • Wildlife - Wild rainbow trout and kokanee are abundant in the area, and the diverse and high-value habitat in the park provide for a range of animal species including grizzly and black bear, ungulates, small fur-bearers, waterfowl, shore-birds, and eagles.

Management Planning

Management Planning Information

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are opportunities for canoeing or kayaking in this park.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

Wild rainbow trout are abundant in both Finger and Tatuk Lakes. An extremely healthy kokanee population also resides in Tatuk Lake. Ice-fishing is allowed in the park during the winter season but best to check with the resorts. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are no developed trails at this park. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is allowed in the park during open season. Please check the BC Hunting and Trapping regulations for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

Swimming opportunities are available but there are no designated swimming areas and no lifeguard present.
Waterskiing

Waterskiing

Waterskiing opportunities are possible on the lakes; be cautious.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There is no viewing platform but the wide range of lake sizes across a landscape interconnected by wetland riparian corridors, provides important habitat features. There are regionally significant populations and habitat for grizzly bear, ungulates, fur-bearer, waterfowl and shore-birds, as well as wild-stock kokanee and rainbow trout.
Windsurfing

Windsurfing

Windsuring is possible on the lakes; be cautious.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

The resorts may have trackset trails for cross-country skiing but the rest of the park is wilderness skiing. There are snowshoeing opportunities on any trail or roadway in the park plus the frozen lakes. Snowmobiles, ski-dooing, tobogganing and ice-skating are allowed in the park but best to check with the private resorts.

Ice-fishing is allowed in the park during the winter season but best to check with the resorts. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.

Facilities Available at this Park

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

A gravel car-top boat launch is located at the east end of Tatuk Lake campground. Finger Lake Wilderness Resort and Tatuk Lake Outfitters & Wilderness Resort both have boat launching facilities at the west side of the park. More information on boat rentals can be obtained by visiting the websites for the private contractors listed below:
Cabins / Huts

Cabins / Huts

There are two resorts in the park that are managed by private enterprises. One is at the west end of Finger Lake and the other is on the northwest shore of Tatuk Lake. More information on accommodations and activities can be obtained by visiting the websites listed below:
Campfires

Campfires

Please conserve firewood. Campfire pits are provided at most campgrounds. Limited burning hours may be in effect at some parks and fire bans may be mplemented during extremely hot weather conditions. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park has pit toilets - flush toilets.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

One rustic recreation site is available for camping. It is located on the east end of Tatuk Lake, and has a boat launch. There are pit toilets but no potable water is provided. Please be advised that this site is the forestry recreation site style and not the BC Parks standard that some might expect. No reservations are accepted. There is also winter camping offered at the private resorts only.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.