Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Gilpin Grasslands Provincial Park

About This Park

Gilpin Grasslands
This park was designated to protect a distinctive grassland ecosystem and maintain essential habitat for known blue provincially listed species-at-risk, including blue listed bighorn sheep.

In addition the park provides easily accessible recreational, educational and interpretation activities.

Special Notes:
  • Stay Safe: Hunters please be aware of recreational park visitors, and visitors please wear bright coloured clothing during hunting season, and be aware of Rattlesnakes and other wildlife. Please take your garbage with you when you leave.
  • Restrictions on Motorised Vehicles Use: Snowmobiles are not permitted. All Terrain Vehicles, Motorcycles and all motorized vehicles are prohibited except as authorized by Ministry of Environment. This does not include the Gilpin Forest Service Road main which weaves in and out of the western boundary of the park and is open to motorized vehicles.

Established Date: May 22, 2007

Park Size: 912 hectares

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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Gilpin Grasslands Park was designated as a Provincial park in May 2007. It is located 9 km east of the municipality of Grand Forks, and encompasses the grassland hills on the north side, and the Kettle River on the south side of Highway #3.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: Prior to colonial times the park was frequented by First Nations people. Early European settlers passed through the area on the Dewdney Trail, checking in at the Customs House run by Ranulph Robert Gilpin. In 1888 Gilpin became the Customs Officer, and his home ranch, situated near where Gilpin Creek crosses the current high-way, saw double duty as the Customs House from 1888 to 1900.
  • Ecology and Conservation: The park protects native grasslands essential to bighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer and whitetail deer along with other endangered, threatened or vulnerable species, some of which include:
    • Red listed – tiger salamander, Western screech owl, Lewis’s woodpecker, badger, great basin pocket mouse and speckled dace fish.
    • Blue listed – Western rattlesnake, gopher snake, California bighorn sheep, great basin spadefoot, Western skink, racer, Western painted turtle and canyon wren.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Canoeing, kayaking and rafting are common activities on the Kettle River. Be aware of rapids and currents in places.
Cycling

Cycling

All trails are open to bicycles. Helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Please stay on established trails.
Hiking

Hiking

There are several unmarked trails in the park for hiking and mountain bike riding. These can be accessed from outside the park at the Gilpin Forest Service Road.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

The lower slopes are conducive to small numbers of horseback riders. Please stay on established trails. Park and unload the trailers on the Gilpin Forest Service Road, as unauthorized motor vehicles are not allowed inside of the park.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting allowed in the park during an open season as specified under the “Wildlife Act.” Please check the BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations for more information
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Dogs must be under control and must not harass wildlife or livestock.
Swimming

Swimming

There are opportunities to swim in the Kettle River.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are many opportunities to view various songbirds and waterfowl.