Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Hitchie Creek Provincial Park

About This Park

Nestled in the Nitinat Lake watershed, Hitchie Creek Park protects old-growth lowland rainforest as well as river and lake ecosystems. The creek provides a key wildlife corridor for large species moving through the watershed, such as Roosevelt elk, black bears, cougars and wolves. A wide range of species - from salamanders to songbirds - reside in Hitchie Creek Provincial Park, which also protects potential habitat for species at risk like the endangered Marbled Murrelet and Keen’s long-eared myotis.

This undeveloped park provides opportunities for wildlife viewing, nature appreciation and wilderness camping. Nearby Nitinat Lake in the adjacent Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is a popular recreation destination for swimmers, boaters, paddlers and anglers

Park Size: 226 hectares

Special Notes:

  • There is no vehicle access to this park. Access is by hiking from Hitchie Lake within the adjacent Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, a rough route approximately 1 km long.

Stay Safe:

  • Open fires are strongly discouraged. We encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. If you must use a campfire, please practice Leave No Trace camping ethics.
  • There is no designated swimming, canoeing or kayaking areas. However, there are swimming and canoeing/kayaking opportunities at nearby Hitchie or Nitinat Lakes (which are outside the park).
Back to Top

Location and Maps

Hitchie Creek is situated to the north of Nitinat Lake and is adjacent to Pacific Rim National Park Reserve on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island. Access to the park is by hiking from Hitchie Lake within the national park, a rough route approximately 1 km long.

Back to Top

Nature and Culture

  • Conservation/Wildlife - Nestled in the Nitinat Lake watershed, Hitchie Creek Park protects old-growth lowland rainforest as well as river and lake ecosystems. The creek provides a key wildlife corridor for large species moving through the watershed, such as Roosevelt elk. A wide range of species, from salamanders to songbirds, reside in Hitchie Creek Provincial Park, including large predators such as black bears, cougars and wolves. The park also protects potential habitat for the endangered Marbled Murrelet and Keen’s long-eared myotis. This park protects sections of the Windward Island Mountain ecosection, underrepresented in the protected area system. The characteristic understory of this mainly Western hemlock forest includes false azalea, bunchberry and oval-leaved blueberry, all of which occur here.
Back to Top

Activities Available at this Park

Fishing

Fishing

Fishing is permitted as per provincial and federal fishing regulations. All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

This park is accessed via an undeveloped route from Hitchie Lake, approximately 1 km long. There are no developed trails within the park.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.
Back to Top

Facilities Available at this Park

Drinking Water

Drinking Water

Water for human consumption can be found in the creek and lake. All surface water must be well boiled, filtered or treated prior to consumption.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

There are no designated campsites at this park, however random wilderness camping is allowed. No facilities are provided and there is no fee. This park is open year-round. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.