This park is currently closed due to fire hazard.
Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Horneline Creek Provincial Park

About This Park

Situated in the Kechika Mountains, this small park protects important habitat for mountain goat. Horneline Creek cuts though a large glacial terrace; steep cliffs provide a refuge for mountain goat. There are few backcountry recreation opportunities.

Established Date: June 29, 1999

Park Size: 298 hectares

Special Notes:
  • Observe mountain goats from a distance so they are not scared or forced to flee.
Stay Safe:
  • Hikers and campers should be prepared for all weather conditions in this changeable climate. Always carry first-aid equipment and extra clothing and food.
  • Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park. Water sources in the backcountry may carry giardia or other parasites. Boil or filter all water when in the backcountry.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Located near the Kechika River, about 130 km south of Lower Post and about 30 km north of Denetiah Park. Access is by river boat and foot. The Kechika River is the main access route to the park. Access to the Kechika River primarily occurs at Skooks Landing, near the community of Fireside, and involves a 250 km boat trip. The historic Davie Trail, which travels from Fort Ware to Lower Post, follows a portion of the Kechika River adjacent to the Rocky Mountain Trench.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: The Fort Nelson Land and Resource Management Plan (1997) recommended the area as a protected area due to wildlife significance; it was subsequently designated as a provincial park in 1999.
  • Conservation: Horneline Creek is located in the Kechika Mountains ecosection of the northern portion of the Rocky Mountain Trench. In the park, Horneline Creek cuts through a large glacial terrace to create steep cliffs. The sandstone bedrock material gives rise to a large mineral lick. Pockets of grasslands and stands of aspen line the canyon.
  • Wildlife: Steep cliffs, providing habitat for mountain goats, occur along either side of Horneline Creek. The most notable feature is a large mineral lick used by goat populations; as many as 60-75 goats have been observed in the area at one time.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Hiking

Hiking

There are hiking opportunities in the park. For your own safety and preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroy plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

There are few opportunities for backcountry horseback riding. Riders should be experienced and prepared for wilderness travel, as there are no designated trails.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. All hunters to the area should refer to the current BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis for detailed information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

While campfires are allowed and campfire rings are provided at each campsite, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Firewood can be purchased in the park or you may bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.