Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
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Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Park Contact

R.L.C. Enterprize Ltd.
E-mail address: office@rlcparks.ca
Phone: (250) 474-1336

Click here to view R.L.C.’s webpage, for additional information.

Juan de Fuca Provincial Park

Bear alert

There is an injured bear in the area. BC Parks is aware of the injured bear and has been monitoring its progress. The bear was struck by a logging truck on September 17th and has been recovering slowly from the accident. Please avoid all contact with the bear and respect a safe distance! Please ensure that your dogs are under your control when in the area. Any concerning behaviour should be reported to park staff and/or conservation officers. 

Conservation Officer Service Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line:

Dial Toll Free 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP)

Warning

Thieves have been known to operate in the Juan de Fuca area, targeting vehicles and personal property of Park Users. Be sure you remove all valuables from your vehicle prior to leaving it unattended, and leave unnecessary belongings at home.

If you have any information regarding these incidents, please contact Sooke RCMP at 250-642-5241 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477

Note: See Tourism BC for transportation options to the Juan de Fuca Trail.

Trail Notices

Slide damage in the vicinity of kilometre 26.3 has resulted in a minor re-route. The area is passable, but visitors are advised to use caution.

A slope failure at Beach Cut-Off #5 (Sombrio Beach-West) has made the West Sombrio alternate trail (located between kilometre 29.3 and 29.9) inaccessible from the east end. Hikers traveling in either direction need to plan accordingly by using tide tables to pass the West Sombrio bluff. Please review the Juan de Fuca hiking page and the trail map. [PDF 192KB]

Be aware that weather events may have resulted in slides, blowdowns, etc., that may affect trail passage. Visitors are reminded to use caution and be prepared for all types of conditions including trail damage resulting from these and other natural events.

Know Before You Go

The Juan de Fuca Marine Trail is designed as a wilderness hiking trail. Hiking conditions are always changing and hikers should get up-to-date information before hiking. Additional advisories may be posted at the trailhead information shelters. Your fitness, knowledge, skills and equipment must meet the challenges of the area. All hikers in your group must be prepared for at least the following:
  • rugged, uneven ground and slippery conditions on muddy trails, wooden surfaces, boulders and rocky shorelines.
  • wading creeks, negotiate steep slopes, climb embankments, and follow an irregular trail.
  • damaged structures, wear and tear, storms and other factors may quickly change their condition.
  • be prepared for rain & damp mists - Incidents of hypothermia and physical injury increase significantly during prolonged wet period.
  • accidents and injuries. It may take hours before help arrives if an accident occurs.
Hikers are advised to leave a plan of their trip, including which trail they are hiking, and arrival and departure times with a friend or relative.

Transport

The Juan de Fuca Trail does not connect to the West Coast Trail, part of Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Private bus service to the Juan de Fuca Trail may be available from nearby communities.

Note: See Tourism BC for transportation options to the Juan de Fuca Trail.

Beach Safety and Tides

Exposed beaches along Juan de Fuca Provincial Park are subject to “rogue” waves. Please show respect for surf and waves. Watch for unusually large rogue waves that occasionally hit the beach. These waves are capable of pulling a person into the water. Keep children away from the surf.

Watch for orange balls as you hike, they mark an exit from the beach to the trail. Beaches may be cut off from the trail during high tides and storms.

Tide tables are posted at trailheads and available at local bookstores. Use Canadian Tide Tables “Port Renfrew” section. Remember to use the PDT (Pacific Daylight Savings Time) for tidal times during May to October as Daylight Savings Time is in effect. Visitors should reference the Fisheries and Oceans tide table for Port Renfrew, Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Bear Safety

This park is prime habitat for bears. Please be bear aware & check out the Bear and Cougar Guide. Remember, A FED BEAR IS A DEAD BEAR.

About This Park

Juan de Fuca Provincial Park Juan de Fuca Provincial Park on the west coast of southern Vancouver Island offers scenic beauty, spectacular hiking, marine and wildlife viewing and roaring surf in its course along the Pacific coastline of the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

There are four main areas to the park: the China Beach Campground, the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail, the China Beach day-use area and Botanical Beach.

A major feature of this park, the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail, follows 47 kilometres of wilderness stretching along the western shoreline of the southern Island. There are four trailheads to the Juan de Fuca Trail at Juan de Fuca East (China Beach), Sombrio Beach, Parkinson Creek and Botanical Beach. Although most of the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail is designed for strenuous day or multi-day hiking/camping in this rugged and isolated area, some easy to moderate day hiking opportunities to the beach or along the trail are available starting from the trailheads.

At the east end of the park you’ll find the vehicle accessible China Beach campground and the China Beach day-use area. The campground is located in a forested area with open understory, about 1 km east of the China Beach day-use area and the Juan de Fuca East (China Beach) Trailhead. Trails connect the campground to China Beach and the adjacent smaller Second Beach, located east of the larger China Beach day-use.

At the west end of Juan de Fuca Park is Botanical Beach, one of the richest tidal areas along the west coast. Botanical Beach also has a unique shoreline framed by ridges of shale and quartz, which jut up through the black basalt to form huge tableaus. Botanical Beach is the western terminus for the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail and a popular day trip destination for visitors wishing to observe this sensitive and unique ecosystem. Wildlife viewing is best done at low tide, when visitors can walk out across the flat sandstone and granite outcroppings to view tide pools filled with brightly coloured marine life.

When visiting Botanical Beach, please look in the tide pools only – do not touch the marine life. Do not remove, collect or disturb any tide pool life, shells, plants, flowers, kelp, etc. Even touching the water in a tide pool with sunscreen on your hands can create an “oil slick” that could kill the vulnerable creatures in this sensitive ecosystem. Remember to bring your camera, as photographs make great souvenirs.

Juan de Fuca Provincial Park offers ample opportunity to view larger marine mammals as well, including Grey and killer whales, which can often be spotted feeding just off the points. The best time to see Grey whales is during their migration from the Mexican coast to Alaska in March and April. Seals and sea lions can also often be seen playing offshore.

Special Features: This park contains numerous special natural features, including waterfalls, grottos, old growth forest, estuaries, tide pools and shale and quartz rock formations.

Park Size: 1,528 hectares

Campground Dates of Operation
All dates are subject to change without notice
Opening and Closing Campground Dates:
(campground is accessible but may not offer full services such as water, security, etc.)
May 15 – September 15
– China Beach campground May 15 – September 15 (campground gate is closed during the off-season)
– Juan de Fuca trail; wilderness campsites All year
Campground Dates with Full Services and Fees:  
– China Beach campground May 15 – September 15
– Juan de Fuca trail; wilderness campsites All year
Campground Reservable Dates: China Beach only:
May 15 – August 31
Total Number of Vehicle Accessible Campsites: China Beach only: 78
Number of Reservable Campsites, if applicable:
(all remaining sites are first-come, first-served)
China Beach only: 47
Note: The above information is for the campground only. Park users can still walk into the park if conditions such as weather permit. Check the "Attention Visitor Notice" above for park alerts.

Reservations

All campsite reservations must be made through Discover Camping. When reservations are not available all campsites function as first-come, first-served.

make a reservation

Campsite Reservations:
Campsite reservations are accepted for the China Beach Campground through Discover Camping. First-come, first-served sites are also available.

Group Campsite Reservations:
No group campsites at this park.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Located on the west coast of southern Vancouver Island, Juan de Fuca Provincial Park extends from China Beach, just west of the community of Jordan River, to Botanical Beach near Port Renfrew. The park is accessed by vehicle at various points along West Coast Highway 14 between Jordan River and Port Renfrew. The China Beach campground is adjacent to Highway 14 just east of the China Beach day-use, 35 km west of Sooke and 36 km east of Port Renfrew. Nearby communities include: Port Renfrew, Sooke, Victoria, Duncan.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: The Juan de Fuca Marine Trail was created through the Commonwealth Nature Legacy as an enduring reminder of the 1994 Victoria Commonwealth Games. Preservation of a living legacy of unprecedented natural beauty, accessible to all, was considered a fitting tribute to the spirit of the Games.
    Construction and preservation of the Trail has been made possible by the efforts of government, local industries, First Nations and citizens. Land exchanges and gifts of land have come from Western Forest Products and Timber West. Trail upgrades have been undertaken with funding from Forest Renewal BC and the Environment Youth Team (E-Team).
    The Juan de Fuca Marine Trail was originally part of a lifesaving trail that serviced this area, known at the time as the Graveyard of the Pacific.
  • Conservation: The park protects significant marine tidal pool life at Botanical Beach as well as black bear and cougar habitat. The region is so biologically significant that the University of Minnesota installed the first marine research station in the Pacific Northwest at Botanical Beach in 1901. Since then, the area has been used for research by a number of universities in BC and Washington. Red, purple and orange starfish and sea urchins, white gooseneck barnacles, blue mussels and green seas anemones and sea cucumbers only begin to hint at the colourful spectrum of intertidal life thriving here.
    Do not harvest shellfish or other plants and animals. They form an important part of the area’s natural environment and are protected under the Provincial Park Act.
  • General Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Canoeing and kayaking opportunities exist at this park, however exposure to the open Pacific Ocean can result in extreme sea conditions. Please be aware of ocean currents.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Cycling is not permitted on the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail. Various logging roads in the area may be available for mountain biking. Cycling on park trails is not permitted. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

This park offers opportunities for salt-water fishing. Botanical Beach, Parkinson Creek from Little Kuitsche Creek to about Payzant Creek are closed to fishing.

Fishing is permitted as per provincial and federal fishing regulations. All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

One of the main features of this park is the scenic Juan de Fuca Marine Trail.
  • The western section of the park around Botanical Beach contains two smaller trails: Mill Bay and Botanical Loop. The Mill Bay Trail accesses a small pebble and shell beach; portions of this trail are steep. Parking for this trail is at the Mill Bay Trailhead, beside the road to Botanical Beach. Botanical Loop Trail connects Botanical Beach and Botany Bay. This is an easy to moderate walk.
  • China Beach day-use: A scenic 1 km trail leads from the parking lot through mature forest to the beach. A large viewing deck offers views of the beach and Juan de Fuca Strait. This is an easy to moderate, fairly steep trail.
  • Second Beach Trail: Second Beach can be reached from the China Beach campground via stairs and a 1 km long fairly steep gravel trail. The 15-20 minute hike (each way) through the mature forest of Sitka spruce, Douglas fir and Western red cedar leads visitors to the great rolling breakers of a tumultuous sea. Benches along the way provide a spot for visitors to stop to enjoy the views of Juan de Fuca Strait.
For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Interpretive Programs

Interpretive Programs

There are interpretations services available at the Botanical Beach area of the park. For more information, please contact the Park Facility Operator.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals are allowed, but must be on a leash at all times. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Dogs are allowed on the trail but backcountry areas of this park are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears and cougars. It is recommended that pets be left at home. Dogs are allowed on the beach area of the China Beach area of the park.
Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving

Limited opportunities exist for scuba diving in Juan de Fuca Park due to the extreme ocean conditions, tides and currents of the area.
NOTE: The foreshore around Botanical Beach and Botany Bay as well as the foreshore from Little Kuitsche to Payzant Creek is closed to scuba diving.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no designated swimming areas at Juan de Fuca Provincial Park. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

Terrific views can be seen from many points along the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail, particularly at the Loss Creek Suspension Bridge and the Minute Creek Suspension Bridge. The Juan de Fuca trail also offers spectacular views of the coastline, Juan de Fuca Strait and the Olympic Mountains. Whales, marine birds and other wildlife can also be seen in the park.

Botanical Beach offers one of the richest tidal areas found along the west coast, and opportunities for viewing in these tide pools is excellent. A low tide of 1.2 metres or less is best for viewing these tide pools. Use Canadian Tide Tables “Port Renfrew” section. Remember to use the PDT (Pacific Daylight Savings Time) for tidal times during May to October as Daylight Savings Time is in effect. Visitors should reference the Fisheries and Oceans tide table for Port Renfrew, Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

When visiting Botanical Beach, please look in the tide pools only - do not touch the marine life. Do not remove, collect or disturb any tide pool life, shells, plants, flowers, kelp, etc. Even touching the water in a tide pool with sunscreen on your hands can create an “oil slick” that could kill the vulnerable creatures in this sensitive ecosystem. Photographs make great souvenirs.
Windsurfing

Windsurfing

Sombrio Beach is a world class surfing area, primarily in the winter months. Windsurfing is also a popular activity in this area.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are not permitted at the Botanical Beach and China Beach day-use areas.

China Beach Campground: While fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. Campfire rings are provided at each campsite. Firewood can be purchased from the Park Facility Operator or you can bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.

Juan de Fuca Marine Trail: Portable campstoves for cooking will be required at some campsites. Small fires are permitted on beaches below the high tide mark. Use only driftwood for fires – do not cut trees or snags or use other vegetation (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Never leave your fire unattended and practice
Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Drinking Water

Drinking Water

  • China Beach: Cold water taps are located throughout the area.
  • Juan de Fuca Trail: Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the area. Water is available from streams but must be boiled, treated or filtered before drinking.
View the Annual Drinking Water System Report [pdf]: China Beach
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park has various day-use and picnic areas at China Beach, Sombrio Beach, Parkinson Creek and Botanical Beach.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park has pit toilets, located at each campground and in the day-use areas. There are no flush toilets.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

China Beach Campground: This area offers vehicle accessible campsites. The campground is located in a forested area with open understory just east of the China Beach day-use area and Juan de Fuca East trailhead. Campsite reservations are accepted and first-come, first-served sites are also available.

Juan de Fuca Trail: No vehicle accessible camping except at three of the trailhead parking lots - Juan de Fuca East (China Beach), Sombrio Beach and Parkinson Creek. These areas are for self-contained units only. Only backcountry fees apply when vehicle camping at Sombrio Beach or Parkinson Creek. Vehicle Accessible Camping fees do apply at China Beach. There is no camping at the Botanical Beach Trailhead.
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $16.00 per party / night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $8.00 per senior party/night. Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.

Winter Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $11.00 per party / night

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness / walk-in camping is available at Juan de Fuca Marine Trail only in both beach and forest sites. Please camp at established camping areas to minimize your impact. The trail and campsites along the trail are open all year. The China Beach campground does not offer walk-in sites and is closed for the winter. Self-registration envelopes and safes are located at each trailhead on the Juan de Fuca Trail for depositing your camping fee. Cash only (bring exact change). Detailed maps of campsites are installed on the trail at each designated camping location.
  • Beach Sites: Camping at Mystic Beach, Bear Beach, Chin Beach and Sombrio Beach (East) is available on the beach. Please use camping pads at West Sombrio camping area; otherwise there are no designated sites. Remember to camp on the beach to prevent degradation of the forest vegetation.
  • Forest Sites: Camping at Little Kuitsche Creek and Payzant Creek is in the forest and away from the beach. There is limited shoreline access at Little Kuitsche Creek and no shoreline access at Payzant Creek. Fires are not permitted at these sites. A portable campstove will be required for cooking. Camp only on designated tent pads.
Backcountry Camping Fee: $10.00 per person / night (persons 16 years of age and older)
Backcountry Camping Fee: $5.00 per child / night (persons 6 - 15 years of age)
Backcountry Registration System
Wheelchair Access

Wheelchair Access

Some facilities at only the China Beach campground are wheelchair accessible.