Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Kianuko Provincial Park

  • Access to Kianuko Park along Kianuko Creek is via the Kianuko Creek Wilderness Forest Service Road. This road has been deactivated to motorized use approximately 2 km from the Kianuko Park Boundary (at it’s junction with the Skelly Creek FSR).
  • Motorized use of this road is prohibited within the Park. The road is in good shape for foot and horse traffic to well beyond the Guide Outfitter cabin in the upper reaches of Kianuko Creek, approximately 15km into the Park. Expect small stream crossings and standing water on the trail (which may be impassable in spring during the freshet).

About This Park

Kianuko Provincial Park The park encompasses the headwaters of Kianuko Creek, which is a tributary of the Goat River, as well as a number of small alpine lakes and meadows. The watershed is largely undisturbed and contains moist cedar-hemlock and Engelmann Spruce Subalpine fir old-growth forest communities. The park protects important habitat for caribou, moose and grizzly bear, and fish.

Established Date: July 12, 1995

Park Size: 11,637.9 hectares

Special Notes:
  • Old forestry roads from Creston may reach the park boundary, but they are not maintained.
Stay Safe:
  • Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.
Click here for Trail Information [PDF] (you will need to scroll down to the Kianuko entry)
Back to Top

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Kianuko Park is situated approximately 40 km north of Creston.
Back to Top

Nature and Culture

  • Cultural Heritage: This is an area of Ktunaxa-kinbasket First Nation traditional use and has high spiritual values.
  • Conservation: The park encompasses the headwaters of Kianuko Creek, which is a tributary of the Goat River, as well as a number of small alpine lakes and meadows. The watershed is largely undisturbed and contains moist cedar-hemlock and Engelmann Spruce Subalpine fir old-growth forest communities. The park protects important habitat for caribou, moose and grizzly bear, and fish.
  • Wildlife: The park protects important habitat for caribou, moose and grizzly bear, and fish.
Back to Top

Management Planning

Management Planning Information
Back to Top

Activities Available at this Park

Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

There are fishing opportunities at this park. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are trails available at this park. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Check our Trail Report for bear and/or safety information. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Horseback riding is allowed in this park.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. All hunters to the area should check the BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations synopsis for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Back to Top

Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are allowed and we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.