Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Park Contact Alex Crabbe
Phone: 250-843-0074
E-mail :  acrabbe@live.ca

Kiskatinaw Provincial Park

About This Park

Kiskatninaw Provincial Park The park is located along the banks of the Kiskatinaw River on the original Alaska Highway, near a historic wooden curved trestle bridge.

From Kiskatinaw Provincial Park, visitors can take a stroll to the bridge and reflect upon the unique history of the Alaska Highway. Jump in the river for a refreshing swim or spend the day fishing.

Please note: This park is being maintained by a local community organization or business. Services and/or facilities may vary from provincial standards.

Park Size: 58 ha

Stay Safe:
  • There are no developed trails at this park.
Campground Dates of Operation
All dates are subject to change without notice
Opening and Closing Campground Dates:
(campground is accessible but may not offer full services such as water, security, etc.)
Generally open on the Wednesday before the May long weekend to mid September. This is may change with earlier opening dates or later closing dates depending on weather.
Campground Reservable Dates: Not applicable
Total Number of Vehicle Accessible Campsites: 28
Number of Reservable Campsites, if applicable: Not applicable
Note: The above information is for the campground only. Park users can still walk into the park if conditions such as weather permit. Check the "Attention Visitor Notice" above for park alerts.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Located 28 km north of Dawson Creek off Highway 97 (Alaska Highway) on the Old Alaska Highway.
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Nature and Culture

  • Cultural Heritage: Threats of a Japanese invasion of Alaska during the Second World War initiated one of the greatest engineering feats of the century--the building of a 1520 mile highway which would connect Alaska to Canada and the United States. Over 11,000 troops endured mosquitoes, black flies, and extreme weather conditions to construct a route over muskeg, mud and river.
    Here at mile 20 on the original highway, the Kiskatinaw River posed an early obstacle. The location of the bridge site, near a hairpin turn on the river, forced construction of a curved right-of-way. Engineers developed this 190 foot wooden bridge with a super elevated (banked) nine degree curve to conform with the bend of the highway.
    Contracted by a Canadian company, construction of this engineering marvel took nine months to complete. It was the first curved wooden bridge built in Canada and today, it is the only curved, banked trestle bridge remaining in Western Canada.
  • Conservation: The park is forested with balsam poplar, white spruce and trembling aspen.
  • Wildlife: Moose and deer may be viewed around the campsite. Squirrels, chipmunks and various songbirds are more common visitors.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

There are fishing opportunities in the park. Fishing in the river may have limited success as the Kiskatinaw river is muddy and shallow at the park. All anglers must have a valid licence when fishing.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks. There is no marked swimming area at Kiskatinaw. Warm water and slow current make it a popular spot for wading and river tubing.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

While campfires are allowed and campfire rings are provided at each campsite, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Firewood can be purchased in the park or you may bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.
Drinking Water

Drinking Water

A hand pump is located in the park. This hand pump may be removed during the off-season.
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

There are areas to enjoy picnicking in the park.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park only has pit toilets – no flush toilets.
Playground

Playground

A swing set, sandbox, horseshoe pits and and kids toys are situated at the grassy area.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $16.00 per party / night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $8.00 per senior party/night. Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.