Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Kitimat River Provincial Park

About This Park

Kitimat River Provincial Park

Kitimat River Park protects two parcels of small but highly productive old-growth Sitka Spruce and Red Cedar forest on the natural floodplain and fluvial terraces of the Kitimat River. It also protects Grizzly Bear habitat and culturally modified trees.

Park Size: 57 ha

Stay Safe:

  • Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.
  • Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Location and Maps

Kitimat River Provincial Park is located about 6 km north of Kitimat and is on the west side of Highway 37, between the power transmission lines to the north and the Snowflake Community Fairgrounds to the south. Access into the park is by foot. Use NTS Map Sheet # 103 I/2.

Visitor Information Centre:

Kitimat Visitor Information Centre
PO Box 214
2109 Forest Avenue
Kitimat, BC, Canada V8C 2G7
http://www.tourismkitimat.ca/
e-mail: info@tourismkitimat.ca
ph: 250 632-6294 or 1-800-664-6554

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

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Nature and Culture

  • History - Kitimat River Provincial Park was designated as a Park on May 20, 2004, following recommendations from the Kalum Land and Resource Management Plan.
  • Conservation - Kitimat River Park is located in the CWHws1 biogeoclimatic zone (Coastal Western Hemlock, wet sub-maritime subzone, Submontane variant). This zone occurs at low to mid-elevations. In general, it is one of the wettest areas in BC and typically has cool summers and mild winters. Mean annual precipitation ranges from 100-440 cm. The park is situated on an active floodplain of the Kitimat River. Vegetation differences throughout the park depend on differences in bench height and frequency of flooding. The soils in active floodplains are usually poorly developed.

    High bench sites have seasonally fluctuating water tables, but only flood every few years. Forests are typically dominated by Sitka Spruce, however Red Cedar, Western Hemlock and Amabilis Fir are also present. The shrub layer is dominated by Devil’s Club. Small amounts of Salmonberry, Alaskan and Oval-leaf Blueberry and young conifers are also present in the understory. Spiny Wood Fern, Oak Fern, Foamflowers, Twisted Stock, and leafy mosses are also common in this plant community.

    Middle bench plant communities have high and prolonged water tables that limit conifer establishment. The most common species in this area are Black Cottonwood, Red-Osier Dogwood, Red Alder, and Salmonberry.

    The low bench plant communities are found adjacent to the river and back channels and are subjected to prolonged annual flooding, sediment erosion and deposition. The occasional Black Cottonwood is found in this area, but the most common species are willows along with Red and Sitka Alder.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information

  • Online Management planning information for this park is not available at this time.
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Activities Available at this Park

Fishing

Fishing

There are opportunities for salmon and steelhead fishing in Kitimat River, to the west of the park. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There is a short (215 m) trail leading through the centre of the park. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting but hunting opportunities are limited. Please refer to the British Columbia Hunting and Trapping Regulations for more information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted. Firewood is not provided. If you must have a fire, please burn only dead and down wood, and be sure to extinguish the fire fully. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil so please use it conservatively, if at all. We encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of campfires and using camp stoves instead. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided in this park.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

There is winter camping in the park. The park is accessible year round.