Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information Park visitors should be aware that the Grand Canyon on the Liard River contains sections of severe rapids (Class IV and higher). River travel is only recommended for experienced paddlers.

Bring your own drinking water, as potable water is not available in the park.

Liard River Corridor Provincial Park and Protected Area and Liard River West Corridor Park

About This Park

Liard River Corridor Provincial Park and Protected Area Liard River Corridor Park contains a diversity of landscapes from high upland plateau and muskeg to the rapids of the Grand Canyon and river bottom old growth spruce forests. The park is home to moose, grizzly bear, Rocky Mountain elk, furbearers, northern long-eared bats, and ecosystems associated with succession from the series of large forest fires that have swept through the Liard River valley.

The Liard River Corridor establishes a large, distinct and relatively undeveloped corridor for long-term protection that offers outstanding recreation opportunities. The area in general offers fishing, hiking, camping, horseback riding, canoeing, river boating, wildlife viewing, hunting, ATV use, and photography.

The Grand Canyon of the Liard, a 30 km stretch of river with dangerous rapids, is an area of tremendous visual quality. Access to the park is by the old road to Nordquist Lake and Elk Mountain. River access is via the Liard River up to as far as Sulpher Creek; some boaters travel the Toad River to reach the park.

Total Size: 89,855 hectares (Liard River Corridor Park - 83,159 hectares; Liard River West Corridor Park - 1,903 hectares; Liard River Corridor Protected Area - 4,793 hectares)
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The Liard River Corridor Park is located along the most northerly progression of the Northern Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia. It is adjacent to one of the most significant hotsprings in Canada, the 1082 hectare Liard River Hot Springs Provincial Park, located on the Alaska Highway, 317 km northwest of Fort Nelson. The Liard River Corridor encompasses the Liard River valley and uplands to the height of land as far east as the Scatter River. Access to the park is by ATV, foot, horse or boat. One motorized route provides access to the north side of the Liard River Corridor Park. On the south side of the Liard River, an old BC Hydro road crosses the Trout River and continues to the Grand Canyon of the Liard. This road provides horseback and foot access, but can be hazardous at the Trout River crossing. River boat access is via the Liard River.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Online Management planning information for this park is not available at this time.
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

For a great day trip, you can canoe about 34 km down the Smith River to the Liard River. At the Hwy 97 bridge over the Smith River, paddle a short distance down the Smith River to the Liard River and then down the Liard River highway bridge at Liard River Hot Springs. The trip is rated a Class 1 with easy access to the rivers from the highway with no portages. Take time to explore the interesting side drainages and fishing for Artic Grayling and Bull trout where smaller tributaries flow in the Liard. Ask the Park Operator or staff at Liard River Hot Springs Lodge about the possibility of arranging a shuttle for a nominal fee.

Park visitors should be aware that the Grand Canyon on the Liard River contains sections of severe rapids (Class IV and higher). River travel in that area is only recommended for experienced paddlers.
Fishing

Fishing

Sport fish species include arctic grayling, chum salmon, bull trout, inconnu, lake whitefish, mountain whitefish, northern pike and burbot. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are no developed trails at this park. On the south side of the Liard River, an old BC Hydro road crosses the Trout River and continues to the Grand Canyon of the Liard. This road provides horseback and foot access, but can be hazardous at the Trout River crossing.
Hunting

Hunting

Liard River Corridor is open to hunting. Hunters going into the Liard River Corridor should reference the BC Hunting and Trapping Regulation synopsis for more information. There is a private company offering hunting excursions into this park. Click here to view Liard River Adventures’ website for more information.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

There are winter recreation opportunities in the park.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted. Campfire pits and firewood are not provided. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented and some parks may use communal fire rings. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.