Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information

Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.  All surface water from the river must be boiled, filtered or treated prior to consumption.

Marble River Provincial Park

  • The gate to the Marble River Recreation Site, leading to the Marble River Trail, is closed for the winter. To access the trail, please park in the first parking lot and walk in through the campground. The gate will be reopened sometime in April 2014, once preseason maintenance has been completed.

About This Park

Marble River Provincial Park Marble River Provincial Park on northern Vancouver Island offers excellent opportunities for wilderness hiking, biking, wildlife viewing and fishing.

The Marble River Trail, a 4.2-km hiking and biking trail, provides access to the river for visitors, who come to watch the salmon spawning in the fall. Interpretive signs along this trail offer information about the forest environment. Salmon spawning viewing areas are located near the trailhead and at Bear Falls, approximately 2/3 of the way down the trail. An interpretive sign and fish ladder are also located at Bear Falls. Visitors should be aware that black bears frequent the park, especially during salmon spawning season. (see bear safety)

Marble River Provincial Park is also a very popular destination for recreational angling, including fly fishing on the river and tidal water fishing in the marine portion of the park. Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead, cutthroat, rainbow and Dolly Varden trout can all be caught in this park. The Marble River Trail contains a number of angler-access routes down to the river, which is considered to be one of the best steelhead fishing rivers on Vancouver Island. The most popular fly-fishing location, known as the Emerald Pools, is located at the end of the trail.

Walk-in wilderness camping is allowed, and a Western Forest Products Recreation Site offers vehicle-accessible camping adjacent to the park.

Park Size: 1,419 hectares
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Marble River Provincial Park is located on northern Vancouver Island, at the juncture of Rupert Inlet, Holberg Inlet, Quatsino Sound and Neroutsos Inlet. The park is located approximately 15 km north of Port Alice and 35 km southwest of Port Hardy. The park can also be accessed by boat from Coal Harbour. Boaters can reference marine chart #3679 (Quatsino Sound) and the more detailed chart for Quatsino Narrows, #3681 (Plans Quatsino Sound).
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Nature and Culture

  • Cultural Heritage - Marble River Provincial Park lies in the traditional territory of the Quatsino First Nations.
  • Conservation - The Marble River flows through a shallow canyon bordered by forest covered bench lands. The park helps preserve spawning and rearing habitat for a variety of fish species and contains portions of the most important Chinook salmon producing system on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The park also contains relatively rare and unique karst features and contributes 56% of the protected habitat within the under-represented Coastal Western Hemlock very wet maritime biogeoclimatic variant in the Nahwitti lowlands ecosection.
  • Wildlife - The park protects fish and wildlife values associated with the river and estuary, including Bald eagle nesting habitat near Quatsino Narrows, steelhead fishery and salmon spawning and rearing habitat, as well as waterfowl habitat.
  • General Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Opportunities for ocean kayaking and canoeing exist in the marine portion of the park, which includes Varney Bay and Quatsino Narrows.
Cycling

Cycling

The 4.2 km Marble River Trail has been designed to accommodate both mountain bikers and hikers. Please obey all signs related to mountain biking safety and ethics.
Fishing

Fishing

Marble River Provincial Park is a very popular destination for recreational angling, including fly fishing on the river and tidal water fishing in the marine portion of the park. Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead, cutthroat, rainbow and Dolly Varden trout can all be caught in this park. The Marble River Trail contains a number of angler-access routes down to the river. The most popular fly-fishing location, known as the Emerald Pools, is located at the end of the trail.

Caution: Anglers should be aware that black bears frequent the area along the river’s edge, especially during spawning season.

All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There is a hiking and biking trail that starts at the end of the upper loop of the Western Forest Products Recreation Site. The trail is 4.2 km; average hiking time one way: 1.5 hours. The trail is generally in good condition but windfall and other debris may be present, so please use extra caution.

The 4.2 km Marble River Trail has been designed to accommodate both mountain bikers and hikers. Please obey all signs related to mountain biking safety and ethics.

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Hunting

Hunting

Portions of this park are open to hunting for specific species. Hunters must have valid licences and tags. Please refer to the current Hunting and Trapping Regulations and Synopsis publication for closures and regulation.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

Ocean swimming. There are no designated swimming area at this park. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

While fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. If you must use a campfire, please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

There are no designated campsites at this park, however random wilderness camping is allowed. No facilities are provided. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.