Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information Drive with caution on access roads, which can become very slippery after rain. Four-wheel drive high clearance vehicles are recommended.

Moose Valley Provincial Park

As of May 22, 2013:
  • Please be aware the cabin located on Maitland Lake is no longer suitable for public use. In keeping with the approved park management plan, the cabin will not be repaired or replaced.

About This Park

Mooose Valley Provincial Park Moose Valley Provincial Park comprises 2,322 hectares of rolling landscape scattered with lakes and wetlands. The area was proposed for protection through the Cariboo public CORE process, and was originally designated a park through the Cariboo Chilcotin Land Use Plan in 1995. The park protects a chain of 12 small lakes, popular as a day or overnight canoeing destination. It is an idyllic place to visit, rewarding paddlers with clear, shallow lakes and abundant aquatic plants and flowers. The many tiny reed-fringed islands and surrounding marshes provide excellent habitat for deer, moose, waterfowl and amphibians.

Stuart Maitland, a local guide outfitter, first cleared and named portages linking the main lakes in the Moose Valley Canoe Chain in the early 1970s, with assistance from Hugh Kirkland and Kevin Marks. These three ambitious young men were in their late teens at the time, and independently sought government assistance to do the work. Today, the three main lakes in the chain are named after the youth who first developed the route. The route was later upgraded in 1987/88 by youth members of the Provincial Job Trac program.

The park is a wonderful place to spend leisure time canoeing, bird-watching, and wildlife viewing. Canoeing along the Moose Valley Canoe Chain is the primary recreational activity, and both day and overnight trips are popular. Camping areas are available at either end of the canoe route, but the only developed sites are located at the main access point at Marks Lake and at the north end of Maitland Lake. While the 1100 Road into Moose Valley isn't maintained in winter, the area is still a haven for cross-country skiing and snow-shoeing. A local outfitter offers one to two-day dog sled tours in the winter and guided canoe trips in the park.

Special Features: Wetlands and sphagnum bogs can be accessed and viewed via canoe.

Park Size: 2,500 hectares
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The park is located approximately 31 km west of 100 Mile House, and can be accessed by driving west on the Exeter Station Road. This road leaves Hwy 97 just north of downtown 100 Mile House, and should be followed to the junction with the 1100 Road. Continue west on the 1100 Road to the 1117 marker. Here, turn right onto the one-lane road and continue in a northwest direction to the main access point of the canoe route at Marks Lake (approximately 9 km). This road is best suited to four-wheel drive, high clearance vehicles. For additional map information, please refer to topographical map numbers: 1:50,000 Gustafsen Lake 92P/12 or 1:250,000 Bonaparte River 92P.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: Lake names recognize the efforts of those who established the canoeing area, such as Stuart Maitland, a local guide outfitter who first cleared and named portage routes in the mid 1970s.
  • Conservation: Moose Valley Provincial Park protects relatively undisturbed wetlands nestled within a dry rolling landscape. These numerous wetlands and small lakes provide habitat for a variety of wildlife species, and are also very rich in delicate sphagnum mosses, which are an important part of the ecosystem. It has been shown that water is purified as it travels through this vegetation.

    The floating peat bogs are very sensitive to degradation by canoeists during low water levels. Because of this, portions of the chain may be restricted during such times. Please do not attempt to push your canoe through at low water.
    The landscape in and surrounding the park provides a snapshot of the area’s glacial history. This extensive wetland complex was the result of the last ice age. Lakes and small ponds were left behind following the melting of large chunks of buried glacial ice. Now they are annually replenished by snow-melt and underground springs. The forested rocky outcrops surrounding the park are also a product of the last ice age.
  • Wildlife: The numerous wetlands and small lakes provide habitat for muskrat and beaver, waterfowl, and of course moose. This area abounds with birds – owls, hawks, grouse, woodpeckers, ducks, loons, grebes, sandhill cranes and a wide variety of songbirds.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

The canoe route consists of a chain of 12 small lakes and is popular for day and overnight trips. The main canoe launch at Marks Lake provides parking as well as 3 campsites and a pit toilet. Maitland and Kirkland Lakes are also accessible by walking trail. The floating peat bogs are very sensitive to degredation by canoeists during low water levels. Because of this, portions of the chain may be restricted during such times.
Hiking

Hiking

The main access road also continues to Maitland Lake and, while it is too rough to drive, it is possible to hike on the road to the cabin on Maitland Lake. It is about a twenty minute walk. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Hunting

Hunting

This park is open to hunting. Please consult the Hunting and Trapping regulations for more information.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

This park provides opportunity for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. However, there are no set tracks and access to the park and trails is not maintained during the winter.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Firewood is not provided. Firewood may be purchased outside the park, or you can bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. While campfires are allowed and campfire rings are provided at each campsite, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park only has pit toilets, located at Maitland and Marks Lake. There are no flush toilets.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

There is a rustic campground at Marks Lake with three small camp sites. They each have a picnic table, fire ring, and a space to park a vehicle. They are nestled amongst the trees and are fairly shady. All campsites are on a first-come, first-served basis; no reservations. There are no pay phones at this park and the closest store is in 100 Mile House. The campsites are open year round if accessible.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.