Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information Bring your own water as potable water is not available in the park.

Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Provincial Park

About This Park

Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Provincial Park

Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Provincial Park protects a provincially significant wetland complex with unique geological features. The wetlands formed in an earth-flow crater and evolved into a complex of raised acidic bogs. In addition, the park protects the habitat for Grizzly Bears, one blue-listed plant species (Bog adder’s-mouth orchid) and one blue-listed plant community (Black Cottonwood / Red-osier Dogwood). The wetlands also provide high-value Coho Salmon and Cutthroat Trout rearing habitat.

Park Size: 171 ha

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Location and Maps

Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Park is located about 10 km north of Kitimat, in a area east of Highway 37 and south of Nalbeelah Creek. There are old, narrow, overgrown logging roads leading into the park and access can be difficult. Use NTS Map Sheet #103 I/2.

Visitor Information Centre:

Kitimat Visitor Information Centre
PO Box 214
2109 Forest Avenue
Kitimat, BC, Canada V8C 2G7
http://www.tourismkitimat.ca/
e-mail: info@tourismkitimat.ca
ph: 250 632-6294 or 1-800-664-6554

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.

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Nature and Culture

  • History - Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands Provincial Park was designated as a park on May 20, 2004 following recommendations from the Kalum Land and Resource Management Plan.

  • Conservation - The Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands protect a provincially significant wetland complex with unique geological features, having formed in an earthflow crater. After earthflows occurred depressions were left at the landslide sites. Wetlands developed in areas where the depressions were lower than the permanent water table. These have since developed into a series of raised acidic bogs, formed from the gradual build-up of organic material. The sphagnum peat in the bog is between 2.3 and 4-m thick. This organic bog material has been carbon-dated to determine the timing of the earthflows. The earthflows are thought to have occurred between 1500 and 2650 years ago.

    One Provincially Blue-listed vascular plant has been reported in the Nalbeelah Creek Wetlands, the Bog adder’s-mouth orchid (Malaxsis paludosa). Also, one Provincially Blue-listed plant community is reported in Nalbeelah Creek Wetland Park, the Black cottonwood / red-osier dogwood (Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa / Cornus stolonifera).

  • Wildlife - Wetland habitats are very highly valued for Grizzly Bears. The wetlands also contain valuable rearing habitat for Coho Salmon and Cutthroat Trout. Nalbeelah Creek has been identified as having a Chum Salmon run that is at a high risk for extinction.
  • General Wildlife, Marine & Outdoor Ethics Information
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information

  • Online Management planning information for this park is not available at this time.
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Canoers may enjoy exploring this park; however, access can be difficult.
Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails or old roads.

Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure. There are old, narrow, overgrown logging roads leading into the park and access can be difficult.

Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. Please refer to the British Columbia Hunting Regulations for more information.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Please Conserve Firewood.

Campfires are permitted. Firewood is not provided.

If you must have a fire, please burn only dead and down wood, and be sure to extinguish the fire fully. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil so please use it conservatively, if at all. We encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of campfires and using camp stoves instead. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented.

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.