Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information
  • This park is a wilderness area that is not regularly patrolled. It was not established with recreation in mind as a primary goal. To visit it you must be experienced in bush navigation in forested areas with few topographic features, and you must be completely self-sufficient.

Nuntsi Provincial Park

  • Tsilhqot’in Nation Aboriginal Title
    park map
    On June 26, 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) granted the Tsilhqot’in Nation a declaration of aboriginal title. Aboriginal title includes the right to exclusive use and occupation of the land, as well as the ability to determine the uses to which the land will be put.

    The map to the right shows the land that is subject to the declaration of aboriginal title. The Province is currently analyzing the SCC’s decision, and is in dialogue with the Tsilhqot’in Nation about access to Tsilhqot’in title land.

    Until further notice, persons interested in access to the Title area for camping and associated recreational activities are encouraged to contact the Tsilhqot’in National Government (http://www.tsilhqotin.ca/index.htm).
  • Due to the Chilko fire that occurred in July 2003, there are still closed trails. Much of the park was burnt and dead trees still pose a safety hazard as well as an access hazard. Please be advised to use Nuntsi Park with caution.

About This Park

Nunsti Provincial Park This park, located north east of Chilko Lake in the Chilcotin Plateau, was established to protect valuable moose habitat. It encompasses abundant wetlands and small lakes.

Activities present in the area before the park’s creation, and still permitted today, include hunting, trapping, and cattle grazing. The historical importance of these uses is recognized, and there is a commitment in the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan to ensuring that such activities continue at existing levels.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The park is located south of the junction of the Taseko and Chilko Rivers. It is centred on Nuntsi Creek and extends eastwards from the creek's headwaters near Britanny Lake to the canyon of the Taseko River. Topographic maps featuring the park land include: 92 O/12 and 92 O/13, although the park boundary is not shown.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: This park was identified for protection in the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan of 1995. Under the plan, uses that were permitted before 1995 will continue in the park: livestock grazing, hunting, trapping and guiding.
  • Cultural Heritage: The park is in the traditional territory of the Ts’ilhqot’in (Chilcotin) First Nation. Cultural heritage sites have not yet been identified in this park. If you find any such sites, note that it is an offence to disturb them or remove anything.
  • Conservation: The area encompasses abundant wetlands and small lake habitats. Due to the difficult access to the area, it has remained a wilderness. The park’s ecosystems are Sub-Boreal Pine/ Spruce in the lower elevations, with some Engelmann Spruce/Subalpine Fir.
  • Wildlife: Moose enjoy the parks low-elevation wetlands during the winter, where the snow pack is lower. Other animals to be found in the park include black and grizzly bear, wolf, cougar, mule deer, and small furbearers such as martin, beaver, muskrat and hare. Waterfowl populate the creeks and wetlands during the summer.
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Activities Available at this Park

Fishing

Fishing

Important Messages to Hunters and Anglers  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

There is horseback riding in this park but the trails are neither marked nor maintained.
Hunting

Hunting

Important Messages to Hunters and Anglers  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Firewood can be purchased from the Park Facility Operator in some parks or you can bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary. No firewood is available. If you must have a fire, please burn only dead and down wood, and be sure to extinguish the fire fully. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil so please use it conservatively, if at all. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided. While technically camping is allowed, there is no easy access to this park, whether on foot, by boat or on horseback.