Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Park Contact Kaloya Contracting Ltd.
E-mail: info@campokanagan.com
Phone: 250 548 0076
(This is not a campsite reservations number)
Please specify PARK NAME when sending/leaving a message.

Click here to view Kaloya Contracting’s web link, for additional information.
Join us on Facebook

Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park

  • Please Note: Thieves are targeting vehicles in parking lots. Please protect yourself by not leaving ANY valuables in your vehicle. Please report any suspicious activity to the RCMP.
  • As of March 2013:
    • Due to recent heavy rain access to Okanagan Mt Park via the South entrance is very rough and a high center 4 wheel drive vehicle is recommended at this time.
    • Due to wet conditions there has been a landslide at the junction of CN Trail on the Wild Horse Canyon Trail. Wild Horse Canyon Trail is still usable.

      Park users are asked to use caution in these areas.

Know Before You Go

Hiking Safely

Divide Lake Trail South is closed permanently. Please use Fredrick Creek Trail instead.

Wildfires have produced many hazards in the area. Visitors should be aware of these hazards and the increased risk of injury prior to entering the park. The hazards include unstable trees, holes and loose rock. The hazards have been reduced along the main trail system and camping areas. Travel off the main trail system has an increased level of risk. If visitors choose to enter this burnt area, they can reduce their risk by:
  • Remaining on the main trail network.
  • Waiting for favourable weather. Calm conditions with no rain or snowfall are optimal for travelling safely.
  • Traveling quickly to reduce exposure time.
  • Spreading groups out to reduce risk of multiple casualties.
  • Stopping or camping only in open flat areas at least one tree length from standing trees.
  • Travelling carefully since contact with roots or trees may cause a tree to fall.
  • Avoiding steep slopes – falling trees and loose rocks may slide downhill.
  • Leaving the area or taking shelter if trees are actively falling.
Mushroom picking or harvesting is prohibited in provincial parks.

About This Park

Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park Above the lakeshore are over 10,000 hectares of rugged landscape with mountain lakes, grasslands and spruce-fir forests accessible only on foot, horseback or bicycle. Trails and rustic campsites are the only facilities in this area of the wilderness. A wonderful setting for hikers – a climb to the top of Okanagan Mountain will lead you to beautiful scenic lake views to the west and the Monashee Mountains to the east.

A boater’s paradise, this wilderness park dominates the east side of Okanagan Lake between Kelowna and Penticton. Six marine campgrounds and secluded bays and sheltered sandy beaches tucked into the 33 km of undeveloped shoreline make water exploring a true adventure.

Park Size: 11,038 hectares

Special Notes:
  • Good, sturdy footwear is essential. Summers are hot in this arid park and hikers should carry water between camping areas. Mountain bikers should carry a map of the park with them at all times.
Back to Top

Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. On the east side of Okanagan Lake, just opposite Peachland on Hwy #97. There are no public roads in the park. Access to the south boundary parking lot is through Naramata to Chute Lake Road. It is 6 km of gravel then 1.5 km of very rough road. It is a total of 25 km from Penticton. Access to the north boundary parking is via Lakeshore Road from Kelowna. Follow for 15 km to the parking area. The road continues past the parking lot but is for private land access only with no public parking. Boat, bicycle, horseback or hike only once inside the park boundary.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
Back to Top

Nature and Culture

  • History: This park was established August 23, 1973.
  • Culture: The colourful history of the Okanagan Valley is very evident in the park. There are archaeological sites and provincially significant First Nations pictographs found on rock outcrops and canyon walls. At one time, the local Salish Indians used Wild Horse Canyon as a wild-horse trap.

    Historic trails form part of the current trail network, some dating back to 1860, when Father Pandosy established an oblate mission near Kelowna. Settlers used a trail through Wild Horse Canyon, but finding the south end of the trail crossed extremely rough and rocky country, Father Pandosy instituted a better trail higher up to the east.

    Goode’s Creek Canyon Trail was named for Dave Goode, supplier of survey crews for the Kettle Valley Railway, built in 1915. Commando Bay was used to secretly train Chinese-Canadians for guerrilla warfare in 1944, during World War II.

    Little remains at the crash site of a DC3 passenger plane that went down in December of 1950 roughly one km northeast of Divide Lake. The two CP Air pilots died in the crash, while 16 others on board were rescued by local search and rescue teams. There is no trail access to the site.
  • Conservation: The park is a representative example of the Okanagan Basin and Okanagan Highlands. The terrain ranges from the deeply incised melt water channels of Goode Creek and Wildhorse Canyon to the 1579m high Okanagan Mountain with spectacular examples of heavily glaciated rock terrain including classic rock drumlins, grooves, flutes and striations.

    The park encompasses ecosystems from three different biogeoclimatic zones: the bunchgrass zone in some of the lower but more exposed areas, the ponderosa pine zone in much of the lower elevations and the interior Douglas fir zone on the upper mountain reaches. Significant old growth Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, Lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce covers more than 2500 hectares. The park’s plant life represents the influence of both the dry southern and wetter northern climates. The park protects a significant portion of undeveloped lakeshore along Okanagan Lake.
  • Wildlife: The variety of ecosystems represented in the park leads to an abundance of wildlife that is surprising in an area so close to Kelowna.

    The rugged rocky terrain is habitat for mountain goats. White-tailed deer, moose, elk, lynx, marten, coyote are also found in the park. Small but very important species are the blue listed Western harvest mouse, Nuttall’s cottontail (the furthest northerly occurrence) and Spotted bat. The Northern alligator lizard and Western skink can be found under rocks or bark in open wooded areas while the Yellow-bellied racer prefers grasslands and open fields.

    Blue listed reptile species found in the park include Western painted turtle, Rubber boa, Gopher snake, Western blue racer and Western rattlesnake. The park protects habitat for five blue and two red listed bird species including the Western grebe and Whiteheaded woodpecker.
Back to Top

Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • There is currently no approved valid management plan for this area. Management plans are prepared as soon as practicable, subject to available resources and the ability of key planning partners to participate.
Back to Top

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are wonderful opportunities for canoeing or kayaking daytrips and multiple day trips along the shoreline of Okanagan Lake bordering Okanagan Mountain Park. Camping among the marine park campsites gives the illusion of being tucked away along the coastal saltwater bays, yet being inland. If possible, use a Canadian Hydrographic Chart 3052 for Okanagan Lake. This is available for a fee. Phone 250 765-3995 in Kelowna and 250 492-2628 in Penticton.
Cycling

Cycling

There are cycling opportunities at this park. Obey the signs that allow mountain biking within Okanagan Mountain Provincial park.
Fishing

Fishing

Norman, Baker and Divide lakes are all stocked with rainbow trout by the Summerland Trout Hatchery. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are a number of hiking trails in this park. Click here for details. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Horseback riding is permitted at this park. Please use the designated trails because the park is rugged and even experienced riders can be challenged. Most areas in the park are inaccessible even by horseback, so please travel with caution.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is permitted only during lawful game hunting season. Check with Hunting and Trapping Synopsis for regulations.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals are allowed in the campground but not in the day-use, picnic areas, beaches, or park buildings. Dogs must be on a leash at all times. Owners are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks. Swimming opportunities are plentiful along the undeveloped shoreline. There are many bays easily accessed by boat that make for a great place for snorkeling.
Waterskiing

Waterskiing

There are opportunities for waterskiing and wakeboarding on Okanagan Lake.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are fantastic views from the Rim Trail, the Pinnacles and the viewpoint just west of the south parking lot. The rugged terrain and steep canyons in the park make viewing an option just about anywhere for sheep, goats, elk, and birds of prey.
Back to Top

Facilities Available at this Park

Cabins / Huts / Yurts

Cabins / Huts / Yurts

There is an old cabin at Divide Lake that was built before the park was established. They are not to BC Parks standards and are user maintained. Visitors planning on staying in these cabins should be self-sufficient and able to camp outside should the cabin be full. The outhouse located at the Divide Lake cabin has since burned down.
Campfires

Campfires

While campfires are permitted and campfire rings are provided at some campsites, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using camp stoves instead. Firewood can be purchased when a Park Facility operator is available on the marine campsites, or you may bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented during the operating season when fire restrictions are in place.
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park is popular amongst Kelowna residents for day-hikes and mountain biking.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park only has pit toilets – no flush toilets.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed at Baker Lake, Divide Lake and Victor Lake in the upland area of the park. The park is open year round with approximately 48 walk-in sites ad boat sites. Camping is also permitted at Buchan Bay, Commando Bay, Goode’s Creek, Van Hyce Beach and Halfway Bay along the lake. Additional camping is allowed at the South parking lot where there are two tables, two fire rings, space for two tents (no tent pads) and a pit toilet. Limited facilities like pit toilets and fire rings are provided at Divide Lake and the marine sites.

Mooring of uninhabited vessels is not permitted at anytime within the Park. Vessels that are found uninhabited, tied to a mooring buoy or tied on shore could be impounded and removed at the owners expense. For additional information on mooring and marine concerns, please contact the area supervisor directly for clarification if needed.
Backcountry Marine Camping Fee: $11.00 per party or vessel / night