Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Park Contact

Jim Hesse
Omineca Area Supervisor
Ph: 250-614-9918
Email: Jim.Hesse@gov.bc.ca

Omineca Provincial Park and Protected Area

About This Park

Omineca Provincial Park and Protected Area Omineca Provincial Park and Protected Area includes 80 km of the Omineca River Valley, the Wolverine Range, the mountains northwest of Germansen Landing to Nina Lake, and the area to the south, including the alpine ridges at the head of Evans Creek and Germansen Lake and surrounding visible areas. This park is primarily a wilderness area providing backcountry opportunities. There are six rustic vehicle accessible camping areas . Also, the Nina Lake South area offers a walk-in, pristine wilderness camping opportunity. This site is rustic and only user maintained.

The community of Germansen Landing and North Takla I.R. #12 are enclaves within the park area. This newly designated 133,369 hectare park and protected area is located approximately 195 km northwest of McLeod Lake.

Special Features: The Germansen Flumes. This park also protects Caribou habitat in the Wolverine Range and provincially significant riparian habitat and wetlands along the Omineca River.

Park Size: 133,369 hectares

Special Notes:
  • This park does not have a boat launch. At the Omineca River Site, there is rough access to the river but trailer-type boat launching is not recommended. Boats can be launched at three of the Germansen Lake campsites - East End, Palm Beach and Rainbow Cove but the launches are naturally formed and have not been developed. A 4 wheel drive is recommended and a winch may be useful.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The Omineca Provincial Park is located approximately 182 km northwest of the town of Mackenzie and approximately 219 km due north of the town of Fort St James. The park can be accessed from either town but both routes are over industrial gravel roads and you may encounter large industrial trucks which usually do not operate on public highways. Road conditions vary depending on the season. The roads are often very rough in places, so the use of cars is not recommended. The communities of Germansen Landing and Manson Creek are central to this area.

From Mackenzie, follow the Finlay Forest Service Road to the 98 km marker and then turn west onto the Finlay Manson Forest Service Road. At 31 km, continue heading north on the Thutade Forest Service Road. At approximately 68 km, the road Ys with the left arm going into Germansen Lake and the right arm heads up to Germansen Landing.

From Fort St James, follow the North Road which at 22 km becomes the Germansen Forest Service Road. This road eventually becomes the North Germansen Road. Approximately 100 km from Fort St James, the road connects to the Thutade Forest Service Road. Continue heading north on the Thutade Forest Service Road all the way up to Germansen Landing. At approximately 68 km, the road Ys with the left arm going into Germansen Lake and the right arm heads up to Germansen Landing.
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Nature and Culture

  • History - Omineca is a Class A Park and encompasses an area of 133,369 hectares. It was established April 11th, 2001. Omineca Provincial Park was first identified for Protected Area status through the Mackenzie Land & Resource Management Plan process to protect the best representation of the Southern Omineca Mountains ecosection and important wildlife habitat. This area has high recreation values that include boating, fishing, scenic viewing and hiking.
  • Cultural Heritage - First Nations traditional use of the area includes a graveyard on the east side of the Omineca River. Two historic trails (Evans Creek and an old wagon road east of Germansen Lake) are located within the park. There are also some historic mining sites, that are remnants from the Omineca Gold Rush.
  • Conservation - One of the best representations of the Southern Omineca Mountain ecosection. Provincially significant riparian habitat and wetlands along the Omineca River, which is important moose winter range and waterfowl habitat. The South Omineca and Germansen Lake areas are important goat habitat. This area is important caribou habitat, as it is the spring calving for the blue listed Northern Woodland Caribou. Also this park protects important Wolverine habitat.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are canoeing/kayaking opportunities on both the Omineca River and Germansen Lake.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Cycling is permitted; however, there are no developed trails.
Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

This park has hiking and/or walking trails; however, these trails are not developed and not mapped. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to trail that have been designated. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Horses and/or horseback riding are allowed in the park.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is permitted only during lawful game hunting season. Check with Hunting and Trapping Synopsis for regulations.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.
Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There are NO LIFEGUARDS on duty at provincial parks.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are wildlife viewing opportunities in this park.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

This area could be of interest to experienced backcountry skiiers. There are also opportunities for experienced snowshoers to explore most areas of the park. There is also a possibility for snowmobiling; however, there is no snowmobiling permitted in the Wolverine Range.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

Campfires are permitted; a limited supply of firewood is provided by the park’s maintenance contractor. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented and some parks may use communal fire rings. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Group Camping

Group Camping

The Discovery Cree site has traditionally been used by hunters in the fall and is a rustic group campsite.
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park has day-use/picnic area. All sites in Omineca Provincial Park and Protected Area can be used for day-use/picnic.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park only has pit toilets - no flush toilets.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

This park offers 6 rustic, vehicle accessible campsites on a first-come, first-served basis and are accessible from June to October, weather permitting. Campsite reservations are not accepted.
  • Germansen Lake has four camping areas located along its shore: Germansen East site located next to the Germansen flumes, which were built in the 1930's for channelling water (used in hydraulic mining) some 14 miles to the Germansen Mine. Though broken and scattered, the flumes can still be seen from several locations along the Germansen Lake road.
  • Germansen Lake site aka Pebble Beach or Palm Beach is located mid way along the lake's north shore. This site has a pea gravel beach.
  • Rainbow Cove is situated on the east side of the narrows just south of the crossing. There is a mix of open field sites and some semi private sites further along the shore.
  • Germansen Narrows aka Gebhardt Arm site is on the west side of the narrows just south of the crossing. This is a narrow campsite close to the road.
The land settlement area has two camping areas:
  • Omineca River site located at 13 mile creek, offers rough access to the river, not suitable for trailer-type boat launching. The Omineca River offers some good fishing and grade 1 or 2 canoeing. Though the Sekani word “Omineca”, means slow moving water, there are a couple of log-jams that may present some minor problems for canoeists/kayakers.
  • Discovery Creek site is being developed more as a group site traditionally used by hunters in the fall.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Nina Lake South is in a pristine wilderness setting that offers backcountry/walk-in camping opportunities. Road access is narrow, rough and usually limited to four-wheel drives. It is recommended not to drive this road but to hike in to the small rustic camping area at the lake. The lake is approximately 6 km from the Thutade Forest Service Road.
NOTE: No facilities are available at this site.