This park is currently closed due to fire hazard.
Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Pitman River Protected Area

About This Protected Area

Pitman River Protected Area provides important wildlife habitat to moose, grizzly bears, caribou and several fish species. It is a key wildlife corridor, providing connectivity to high value habitat in adjacent areas. The high wildlife values provide a setting for a rich native and non-native history. Visitors to the Pitman River often come by jet-boat via the Stikine River to hunt for moose in this remote wilderness park.

Established Date: January 25, 2001

Park Size: 16,316 hectares

Special Notes:
  • A Letter of Permission is required for individuals or groups who wish to use horses within Pitman River Protected Area. To obtain a Letter of Permission, please contact the BC Parks Stikine Area Office at 250 771-4591. If there is no answer, please leave a detailed message stating your request for a letter of Permission, your name, contact information and the date you wish to visit the park. BC Parks will return the call as soon as possible.
  • Only permitted air charter companies are authorized to fly into Pitman River Protected Area.
  • Permitted Air Charter Companies for Pitman River Protected Area:
    • Alpine Lakes Air Ltd.
      Float plane base located on Tyhee Lake near Telkwa, B.C. 250 846-9488
Stay Safe:
  • Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.
  • There are no developed trails in this park.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The Protected Area covers a corridor along the Pitman River to where it joins with the Stikine River Park. Access via the Stikine is possible by jet-boat, canoe or kayak or by float plane.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: Europeans first visited the area of the Stikine Country Protected Areas in 1824 and in the following year, the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Russian American Company claimed areas for trapping. The search for gold began in 1861, and by 1878 most of the Stikine River drainage had been explored. From 1896 to 1902, Andrew J. Stone conducted expeditions into the Cassiar to collect specimens for the American Museum of Natural History. With his announcements of the discovery of several “new” species of sheep and caribou, the area became a destination for hunters. Local natives worked as hunting guides and camps were set up throughout the region. Scientists began studying the significant wildlife values in the area in the 1950s and with the efforts of Tommy Walker, Spatsizi Plateau Wilderness Park was designated in 1975.

    Pitman River Protected Area was designated by the Provincial Government in 2001 following recommendations on the Cassiar Iskut-Stikine Land and Resource Management Plan.
  • Cultural Heritage: Pitman River lies within the asserted traditional territories of the Tahltan First Nations, Kaska Dena Council and Carrier Sekani Tribal Council. Although archaeological studies have not been done in the park, it is likely to contain archaeological sites because high wildlife values would have attracted native and non-native usage.
  • Conservation: Pitman River Protected Area is within the Cassiar Ranges Ecosection and the Southern Boreal Plateau Ecosection.
  • Wildlife: Pitman River contributes to a network of parks in the Stikine area which provide habitat to a wide range of animals. Three blue-listed species whose habitat is protected in the protected area are the wolverine, the fisher and the grizzly bear. The whole protected area is considered high value habitat for caribou, while significant wetland moose habitat is found along the river, which also provides good quality grizzly habitat. Mountain goats and Stone’s sheep are found in the upper elevations. Other species found in the park include wolf, black bear, lynx, coyote, red fox, marten and minx.

    The Stikine, Chuckachida and Pitman River Parks represent the only fully protected area in B.C. enclosing contiguous streams, large rivers and lakes believed to support bull trout in the full diversity of its life histories. Other fish species found in the Protected Area waters include Dolly varden and char, while rainbow trout and arctic grayling are likely to be found but have not been confirmed.

    Pitman River Protected Area is a key wildlife corridor, providing connectivity to high value habitat in adjacent areas.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Protected Area

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are opportunities for canoeing or kayaking in this park. For more information on canoeing or kayaking the Stikine/Spatsizi Rivers click here.
Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

A Letter of Permission is required for individuals or groups who wish to use horses within Pitman River Protected Area. To obtain a Letter of Permission, please contact the BC Parks Stikine Area Office at 250 771-4591. If there is no answer, please leave a detailed message stating your request for a letter of Permission, your name, contact information and the date you wish to visit the park. BC Parks will return the call as soon as possible.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is permitted within Pitman River Protected Area. Please refer to current BC Hunting Regulations for seasons and bag limits.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
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Facilities Available at this Protected Area

Campfires

Campfires

Fires should be used sparingly, as they are among the most serious visual impacts in the backcountry. Always carry a stove; use it for most if not all of your cooking needs and only build a fire when it is safe and will not cause further damage or deplete wood supplies.
Please check for campfire bans and the Fire Danger Rating for the area you are visiting before igniting a fire in the backcountry. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. For more information on campfires in the backcountry, click here.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.