Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park and Protected Area

  • Please note: The Catfish Creek Forest Road accessing the park is washed out at 3 km and 12 km and both foot bridges crossing Ptarmigan Creek along with sections of the trail along Ptarmigan Creek have also been washed away.

About This Park

Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park & Protected Area Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park and Protected Area is a narrow, steep-sided valley at the north end of the Cariboo Mountains Ecosection above the Upper Fraser Trench.

The park protects 4,633 hectares of the complete, intact watershed of the east branch of Ptarmigan Creek, a tributary to the Fraser River.

Special Features: The park protects an entire watershed and habitat for Caribou and Grizzly Bears.

Park Size: 4,633 hectares

Stay Safe: Bring your own drinking water as potable water is not available in the park.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The access road to the park and protected area is about 5 km west of Crescent Spur, about 165 km east of Prince George along the Yellowhead (Highway 16) corridor, approximately 500 m west of Catfish Creek. Ptarmigan Creek Provincial Park is close to Erg Mountain Provincial Park, and the two parks share to same access road and trail head. The trailhead is 8kms from highway 16.
The closest communities to this park are Prince George and McBride.
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Nature and Culture

  • Wildlife - The park protects caribou, grizzly bear and mountain goat. Chinook salmon, rainbow trout and sculpin are found in the lower reaches of Ptarmigan Creek.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Fishing

Fishing

Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence. Please read BC Freshwater Fishing Synopsis for site specific information.
Hiking

Hiking

From Crescent Spur along the Yellowhead Highway (Hwy 16), the park is accessible via the Ptarmigan Creek Forest Road (about 8 km). From this location, an 11 km trail follows Ptarmigan Creek to three subalpine lakes (Hammel Lakes) near the headwaters.

High waters during the 2001 summer season have washed out many sections of the trail and the footbridge crossings.

NOTE: the trail is not well marked. The trail is not recommended for inexperienced people as it is difficult to follow due to dense shoulder-high vegetation and few markers.

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is permitted only during lawful game hunting season. Check with Hunting and Trapping Synopsis for regulations.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.
Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are wildlife viewing opportunities in this park. There are beautiful mountain lakes and great view from different ridges.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

There are backcountry skiing opportunites and showshoeing opportunities available on the regular summer trails. However, no cross country skiing tracks are set.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

No firewood available. Please bring a portable stove for cooking. Firewood can be purchased from the Park Facility Operator in some parks or you can bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented and some parks may use communal fire rings.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

Winter camping is open for backcountry skiing, but no facilites are provided.