Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information
  • Visitors must stay on the trails and within the viewing area. Rocks and river edges can be extremely slippery.

General Visitor Safety Information (park safety, hazards, wildlife safety information, health risks)

Park Contact Sea to Sky Park Services Ltd
Email address: info@seatoskyparks.com
Phone: (604) 986-9371

Shannon Falls Provincial Park

About This Park

Shannon Falls Park Shannon Falls is composed of a series of cliffs, rising 335 metres above Highways 99, making it the third highest falls in the province, ranking behind 481 metre Della Falls in Strathcona Provincial Park on Vancouver Island and 396 metre Hunlen Falls in Tweedsmuir Provincial Park near Bella Coola.

The tumbling waters of Shannon Falls originate from Mount Habrich and Mount Sky Pilot.

This park is directly adjacent to Highway 99, making it a popular day-use park. This park provides picnicking, hiking and access to the trail in Stawamus Chief Provincial Park.

For your convenience this park has a concession and information centre located next to the flush toilet building on the trail to the waterfalls. The small centre is managed by the Park Facility Operator and offers food snacks, park and outdoor recreation information and souvenirs.

Park Size: 87 hectares

Reservations

There is no camping at this park, but group picnicking reservations are accepted.
Reservable from May 1 to October 15.

Make A Reservation
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only - they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. The park is located just off of Highway 99, 58 km north of Vancouver and 2 km south of Squamish. Shannon Falls is immediately adjacent to Stawamus Chief Provincial Park. Squamish and Brittania Beach are the closest communities to the park.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: In 1792 Captain George Vancouver set up camp just west of the falls. The falls were named after Shannon who in 1890-1900 owned the falls and surrounding area and used the clay deposits to make bricks. He then sold the land to Brittania Copper Mines in 1900. In the 1930’s, the area was used as a relief camp for the workers building Highway 99. In 1976 the area was purchased by Carling O’Keefe Brewery, who used the pure mountain water to brew their beer, and made the area a logging show park. In 1982 O’Keefe donated the land to BC Parks. Throughout the park area there is evidence of logging activity that occurred here roughly 90 years ago. A number of excellent spring board notches on old stumps are scattered throughout the forested area and much of the deadfall also exhibits evidence of the logging techniques of this period.
  • Culture: This park holds significant spiritual value to the Squamish First Nation, the first people to live in this area. They told of a two headed sea serpent, Say-noth-ka who lived in and around Howe Sound. According to legend this beast travelled both on land and in water. Some versions say it was Say-noth-ka who formed Shannon Falls by slithering and twisting his powerful body up the mountainside on repeated expeditions, Say-noth-ka gradually wore down a spillway for those cascading waters.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Approved Master Plan for Shannon Falls Provincial Park is available in PDF format. [PDF 728.4KB]
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Activities Available at this Park

Climbing / Rapelling

Climbing

There are climbing/rock climbing opportunities in this park. There are some multi-pitch and bolted routes; however, there are no designated trails to the climbing routes. The Best Practices Guide For Rock Climbing Route Development in the Squamish Area Provincial Parks is available here. [PDF 2.18MB] This Best Practices Guide recommends new guidelines and considerations for rock climbing route cleaning, including route development, and intends to balance climber’s needs with protecting the environment and public safety.
Cycling

Cycling

Cycling is permitted on roadways and trails.
Hiking

Hiking

There is an easy 350 metre long walking trail through a forest of Western hemlock, Douglas fir and Western red cedar along Shannon Creek which leads to the viewpoint. This viewpoint affords a spectacular view of the roaring falls. Be cautious of slippery wooden walkways and rushing water during heavy rains. Heavy rains can cause sudden increased volume in water flow and carry debris. Wading in the creek or climbing onto rocks and torrent debris is extremely dangerous and not recommended. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are viewing platforms in this park that offer spectacular views of Shannon Falls.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

This park is open during winter months with limited services. Access may be limited due to snowfall.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Drinking Water

Drinking Water

A drinking water fountain is available at the washroom building during the summer season. It is recommended that park visitors bring their own water due to the small size of the drinking water fountain (not suitable to fill water containers).
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

Most picnic tables are equipped with BBQ holders, bring your own briquettes. Reservations for the group site picnic area are available, but the group area does not have picnic tables. Click here for reservation information.
A Park Use Permit is required for special events. Fires are not permitted in the day-use area. There are both flush and pit toilets available. Garbage bins are provided. The parking lots are extremely vulnerable to vehicle break-ins. This park is very busy during summer months and is frequented by several bus tour companies. The gate is closed between 10pm and 7am.
Group Picnicking Fee: $50.00 per group
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit and flush toilets are located throughout the park. The flush toilet building is closed after Thanksgiving and re-opens on March 15.
Wheelchair Access

Wheelchair Access

There are wheelchair accessible toilets in the day-use area. Although the trail is not paved, the surface is a fairly packed crusher dust base trail which is suitable for most wheelchairs. A secondary trail, with an incline provides access to the viewing platform, although assistance may be required. There are also a few wheelchair accessible picnic tables and a drinking fountain.