Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Park Contact R.L.C. Enterprize Ltd.
E-mail address: office@rlcparks.ca
Phone: (250) 474-1336

Sproat Lake Provincial Park

Due to the recent water system upgrades at Sproat Lake Provincial Park, RVs will no longer be able to fill their vehicle reservoir tanks from the taps in the park. The closest water filling station would be at the sani station by Canadian Tire in Port Alberni.

Note: there are still cold water taps located at both campgrounds and in the day-use area.

About This Park

Fresh water adventure seekers will not want to miss a visit to Sproat Lake Provincial Park in the Alberni Valley on central Vancouver Island. Located 15 minutes west of Port Alberni, Sproat Lake is a favoured location for swimming, fishing, waterskiing and, when the wind is up, windsurfing.

A variety of short access trails lead visitors around this park, including a trail to the eastern end of Sproat Lake, which is home to one of the finest panels of prehistoric petroglyphs in British Columbia. Little is known about this petroglyph, named K’ak’awin, but it isn’t hard to imagine this rock carving as depicting some mystical ancient monsters of the lake.

Two separate campgrounds and a large day-use area make this park a popular destination for campers and picnickers, who come here to enjoy the host of recreational pursuits available or just relax in the sun by the warm lake.

Park Size: 43 hectares

Campground Dates of Operation
All dates are subject to change without notice
Opening and Closing Campground Dates:
(campground is accessible but may not offer full services such as water, security, etc.)
– Lower campground Open year round
– Upper campground May 15 – October 15 (campground gate is closed during the off-season)
Campground Dates with Full Services and Fees:  
– Lower campground April 15 – October 15
– Upper campground May 15 – October 15 (campground gate is closed during the off-season)
Campground Reservable Dates:  
– Lower campground - 100% reservable May 15 – August 31
– Upper campground May 15 – August 31
Total Number of Vehicle Accessible Campsites: Lower campground = 14
Upper campground = 44
Number of Reservable Campsites, if applicable:
(all remaining sites are first-come, first-served)
Lower campground = 14
Upper campground = 33
Note: The above information is for the campground only. Park users can still walk into the park if conditions such as weather permit. Check the "Attention Visitor Notice" above for park alerts.

Reservations

All campsite reservations must be made through Discover Camping. When reservations are not available all campsites function as first-come, first-served.

Reserve a site

Campsite Reservations:
Campsite reservations are accepted at this park and first-come, first-served sites are available.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Sproat Lake Provincial Park is located 13 km northwest of Port Alberni on central Vancouver Island. The park sits on the north shore of Sproat Lake, and can be reached via Hwy #4.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: Sproat Lake is named after Gilbert Malcolm Sproat, a native of Galloway, Scotland who arrived on Vancouver Island in 1860 with men and equipment to establish a sawmill at the head of the Alberni Canal.

    Sproat was the resident manager of Anderson & Company, Victoria, that exported spars to Europe from Puget Sound and Vancouver Island, a business transferred to southern ports after the end of the US Civil War. As Sproat was a frequent visitor to the west coast of Vancouver Island in connection with his business, he was appointed Principal Customs Officer; his duties included control of the First Nations. Some of his experiences and observations are embodied in his very interesting and now scarce book “Scenes and Studies of Savage Life”, published in London in 1868.

    The park was given to the province in 1966 by MacMillan Bloedel Limited. Before it became a provincial park it was known as Smith’s Landing, after George Smith, who farmed the area.
  • Cultural Heritage: Sproat lake Provincial Park is home to one of the finest panels of prehistoric petroglyphs in British Columbia. Little is known about this petroglyph, named K’ak’awin, but it isn’t hard to imagine this rock carving as depicting some mystical ancient monsters of the lake.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Approved Master Plan [PDF 956.08KB] for Fossli, Taylor Arm and Sproat Lake Provincial Parks is available online in pdf format.
    DISCLAIMER:
    This is NOT the original management planning product. This document has been scanned from the original format of the plan. It may contain some formatting changes, however the content is consistent with the original.
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Canoeing and kayaking opportunities exist at this park. Paddlers can set in at the boat launch or at any accessible point along the lake.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

There are opportunities for fresh water fishing in Sproat Lake. Fishing is permitted as per provincial and federal fishing regulations and is subject to closures. All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Specific closures will be posted in the park. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are only short access trails in this park. The upper campground is connected to the lower campground and beach access by a trail that leads through a highway underpass. A ½ km trail leads from the main parking lot at the day-use area and along the lake to a small pier at the east end of the park. At the pier, visitors can view the park’s panel of prehistoric petroglyphs, considered one of the finest in British Columbia. Little is known about this petroglyph, named K’ak’awin, but it isn’t hard to imagine this rock carving as depicting some mystical ancient monsters of the lake. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Interpretive Programs

Interpretive Programs

Every Saturday, throughout the summer, join a Park Naturalist for a Jerry’s Rangers program at 3:00pm for children ages 5-11 and at 7:00pm for an all ages program or guided hike. Check with the Park Host for program locations. In addition, campers and day users should check on notice boards, and with the Park Hosts for information on additional programs being offered during their stay as well as keep their eyes open for the friendly Park Naturalists in green shirts roving the Park.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash and under control at all times and are not allowed in beach areas. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Scuba Diving

Scuba Diving

Sproat Lake offers opportunities for fresh water scuba diving.
Swimming

Swimming

The warm waters of Sproat Lake are ideal for swimming. There are two main swimming areas in the park - near the boat launch in the day-use area and at the lower campground. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
Waterskiing

Waterskiing

Waterskiing is a popular activity on Sproat Lake. A boat launch is located near the day-use area.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

A pleasant walk to the eastern end of Sproat lake will bring visitors to a small pier from which they can view one of the finest panels of prehistoric petroglyphs in British Columbia. Little is known about this petroglyph, named K’ak’awin, but it isn’t hard to imagine this rock carving as depicting some mystical ancient monsters of the lake.
Windsurfing

Windsurfing

When the wind is up, Sproat Lake offers opportunities for windsurfing.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

There is a boat launch available at this park. This boat launch is very busy during the summer season.
Campfires

Campfires

While fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. Campfire rings are provided at each campsite and in the day-use area. Firewood can be purchased from the Park Facility Operator. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Drinking Water

Drinking Water

Cold water taps are located at both campgrounds and the day-use area. Taps are shut off during the off-season.
View the Annual Drinking Water System Reports [pdf]: Sproat Lake lower campground, Sproat Lake upper campground
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park has a large day-use/picnic area, located next to the lower campground. Three separate picnic sites are conveniently located throughout the day-use area. Facilities include a number of picnic tables set under a canopy of Douglas fir and Western red cedar, fresh water, campfire rings, a large grassy area, pit toilets and 2 flush toilet buildings (one next to the boat launch and one by the lower campground.) The grassy area and beach are also suitable for picnicking, or just lounging in the sun next to the lake.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit toilets are located throughout the park and at the upper campground. Flush toilets are located at the day-use area by the boat launch and at the lower campground.
Playground

Playground

The playground is located in the upper campground near campsite 1.
Showers

Showers

There are hot showers at this park. The shower building is located adjacent to the boat launch and next to the lower campground.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

There are two separate campgrounds with vehicle accessible campsites in this park. The Lower campground is located close to the lake. The Upper campground is located across the highway from the lake and is connected to the lower campground and beach access by a trail that leads through a highway underpass. Campsite reservations are required and first-come, first-served sites are available.
Upper Campground Rate:
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $21.00 per party / night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $10.50 per senior party/night. Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.
Lower Campground Rate:

Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $25.00 per party / night

BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $12.50 per senior party/night. Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.
Wheelchair Access

Wheelchair Access

Some facilities in the park are wheelchair accessible.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

Lower Campground Rate:

Winter Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $11.00 per party / night