Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Sukunka Falls Provincial Park

About This Park

Sukunka Falls Provincial Park With a backdrop of the Rocky Mountains, the Sukunka River highlights a scenic vista as it cascades over vertical bands of bedrock layers in a series of waterfalls and rapids. Three sets of falls are located in the park, the northernmost being the most impressive of the series. Unique viewing opportunities are offered of the Sukunka Falls and rapids from roadside locations.

In addition, the river setting provides visitors with a variety of recreational opportunities, which include fishing, hiking, picnicking, and camping.

Established Date: July 30, 1981

Park Size: 360 hectares

Stay Safe: Backcountry and Marine Ethics
  • The Sukunka River drops 50 metres from one end of the park to the other. Below the falls, the water is navigable by canoe and riverboat. Always use caution, the Sukunka River can be challenging even to experienced canoeists and boaters.
  • Visitors to this park are advised when travelling the Sukunka Forest Service road to use extreme caution and have the radio frequency to maintain contact with the truck traffic.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Sukunka Falls Provincial Park is located approximately 45 km south of Chetwynd via the Chetwynd-Tumbler Ridge Highway and the Sukunka Forest Service road. At km 21 of the Sukunka Forest Service road, there is a pullout which provides visitors with a good view of the falls, rapids and surrounding parkland.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: Sikanni and Beaver First Nations are known to have occupied the Sukunka Valley during the time of European exploration in the Peace River region. Prescott Fay, in 1914 wrote: “At this point the river goes through a rocky canyon, above which are a series of very pretty cascades and small, symmetrical falls, so much so as to be almost artificial.” In 1966 a reserve was established to preserve the scenic upper falls viewpoint and in 1972 it was expanded to include the lower falls. Sukunka Falls was established as a Provincial Park in 1981.
  • Cultural Heritage: The Sikanni and Beaver First Nations have traditionally used the area.
  • Conservation: Boreal white and black spruce is characteristic of the valley bottom with stands of aspen, cottonwood, and poplar. The Sukunka valley has been identified as key winter range for moose and deer.
  • Wildlife: Wildlife species inhabiting the park area include moose, black bear, lynx, wolf, and hare as well as a wide variety of avian species such as loons, grebes, spruce grouse and bald eagles. Within the Sukunka River arctic grayling, bull trout, Rocky Mountain whitefish, and rainbow trout are common.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information

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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

The Sukunka River drops 50 metres from one end of the park to the other. Below the falls, the water is navigable by canoe and riverboat. Always use caution, the Sukunka River can be challenging even to experienced canoeists and boaters.
Cycling

Cycling

Bicycles must keep to roadways. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.
Fishing

Fishing

Within the Sukunka River, arctic grayling, bull trout, Rocky Mountain whitefish, and rainbow trout are common. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

There are no developed trails at this park. Visitors adventuring into backcountry/wilderness area, should be cautious and safe.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

Horses and/or horseback riding are permitted in the park.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are wildlife viewing opportunities in the park.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.