Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information
  • Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park is remote. Visitors must be self-sufficient and competent in order to deal with the challenges of the outdoors. BC Parks does not provide rescue services.
  • Only experienced boaters and kayakers should attempt Chilko Lake, due to the unpredictable winds and other challenges such as high waves, icy waters, and a shortage of safe landing areas. Canoeing on Chilko Lake is not recommended.
Park Contact Xeni-Gwet’in First Nation contact information:
http://xeni.ca/, http://www.xenigwetin.ca/

Park Operator – Campground Operations Phone: 250 394-7023

Ts’ilʔos Ranger – Park patrol Phone: 250-394-7023

Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park

Tsilhqot’in Nation Aboriginal Title
park map
On June 26, 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) granted the Tsilhqot’in Nation a declaration of aboriginal title. Aboriginal title includes the right to exclusive use and occupation of the land, as well as the ability to determine the uses to which the land will be put.

The map to the right shows the land that is subject to the declaration of aboriginal title. The Province is currently analyzing the SCC’s decision, and is in dialogue with the Tsilhqot’in Nation about access to Tsilhqot’in title land.

Until further notice, persons interested in access to the Title area for camping and associated recreational activities are encouraged to contact the Tsilhqot’in National Government (http://www.tsilhqotin.ca/index.htm).

About This Park

Ts’ilʔos Provincial ParkPhotoGallery
Ts’ilʔos (pronounced “sigh-loss”) Provincial Park comprises rugged mountains, clear blue lakes, glaciers, alpine meadows, and waterfalls. It is bordered by the rugged peaks of the Coast Mountains to the west, and the dry Interior Plateau to the east. The diversity and contrast in landscapes and vegetation are a result of a rainshadow effect on the east side of the mountains. While the northern and eastern portions of the park are relatively dry, the south end of Chilko Lake is characterized by moist areas of the coastal western hemlock zone.

The provincial park was established in January of 1994 as a wilderness area set aside to protect vegetation, wildlife and fish habitats, cultural values, and special features. The diverse ecosystems in the park remain largely undisturbed by human activity, making this park an ecologically significant area in the province. Chilko Lake, the largest, natural high-elevation freshwater lake in Canada, dominates the park. Stunningly beautiful, due to its blue-green hues and dramatic mountain backdrops, Chilko Lake is popular with boaters, kayakers, and anglers. Backcountry hiking and camping is also a cornerstone of the recreational opportunities offered by this remote park.

Note: Ts’ilʔos Park is co-managed through a Memorandum of Understanding between BC Parks and the Xeni Gwet’in First Nations Government.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park is located in a relatively undeveloped and isolated part of the Chilcotin. As the crow flies, the park is approximately 160 km southwest of Williams Lake, or 250 km north of Vancouver. There are two main vehicle access routes into the park, and two campgrounds, one at the end of each route. Both routes take 4 – 6 hours from Williams Lake, though travel time varies considerably depending on weather conditions. Roads are rough, and conditions vary considerably. Drive carefully and with lights on. The nearest communities to the park are Nemiah Valley, Hanceville, Tatla Lake and Williams Lake.

No scheduled flights serve the park. Several airstrips are located outside the park boundary; a Park Use Permit is required for commercial air access within the park.

Topographical map numbers 1:50,000 92N/1, 92N/8, 92O/4, 92O/5, 92N/9, 92J/13 and 92K/16 cover the park. These are necessary for hikers, horseback riders and other backcountry travellers.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Master Plan for Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park [PDF 1.14MB].
  • Appendices for Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park Master Plan [PDF 948KB].
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Kayaking is popular on Chilko Lake. Canoeing on Chilko Lake is not recommended.
Climbing / Rapelling

Climbing

There are climbing opportunities available at the south end of Chilko Lake; however they are remote and hard to access.
Cycling

Cycling

The Ts’ilʔos Management Plan provides opportunities for mountain biking on designated roads and low elevation trails so that there is minimal impact on the environment or conflict with other users. Please see designated areas below:
Mountain Biking is permitted on:
  • The Yohetta Valley trail as far as the West end of Yohetta Lake (Olson’s Cabin)
  • Existing roads and as designated in the North Chilko Lake Unit
  • Existing roads in the Tsuniah Unit
  • Existing roads in the Tullin Unit
At all times horses and hikers have priority.

Mountain Biking is not permitted in the following areas:
  • Ts’ilʔos Unit
  • Lord River Unit
  • Stikelan South Unit
  • South Chilko Lake Unit
Please view the attached map for the different Ts’ilʔos Management Units. [PDF 266KB]
Fishing

Fishing

Important Messages to Hunters and Anglers  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/
Hiking

Hiking

The backcountry of Ts’ilʔos Park is recommended for experienced travellers only who are equipped for trail finding, first aid, and survival situations. Hiking routes are not maintained and there are no facilities. Click here for Trail Information.

In order to meet budget targets, trail maintenance has been reduced on the Yohetta/Tzchaikazan Loop Trail in this park. Although this trail will remain open, users may encounter fallen trees and/or trail wash-outs. Extra caution is advised.

For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

There is horseback riding at this park, although trails are neither maintained nor marked.

Tsylos Park Lodge offers a number of recreational opportunities in this park (including horseback riding expeditions, hunting trips and flyfishing). Click here to view Tsylos Park Lodge’s web link, for additional information.
Hunting

Hunting

Important Messages to Hunters and Anglers  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks. There is no developed sandy beach, and the water is very cold.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

It is possible to crosscountry ski and snowshoe in the park, however, there are no set trails.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

Update Feb 2015: See “Attention Visitors” message at the top of this page regarding this and the following amenities.
Campfires

Campfires

Drinking Water

Drinking Water

Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.