Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information
  • Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park is remote. Visitors must be self-sufficient and competent in order to deal with the challenges of the outdoors. BC Parks does not provide rescue services.
  • Only experienced boaters and kayakers should attempt Chilko Lake, due to the unpredictable winds and other challenges such as high waves, icy waters, and a shortage of safe landing areas. Canoeing on Chilko Lake is not recommended.
Park Contact Xeni-Gwet’in First Nation contact information:
http://xeni.ca/, http://www.xenigwetin.ca/

Park Facility Operator – Campground Operations Phone: 250 394-7023

Ts’ilʔos Ranger – Park patrol Phone: 250-394-7023

Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park

  • Please note as of September 8, 2014: Gwedat’sih Campground and boat launch area closed due to increased bear activities in the area.
  • Please be aware: Black and grizzly bears inhabit the park and can be encountered at any time. Each year, depending on increasing seasonal bear activities, the Gwedat’sih campground, boat launch and the Mt. Tullin Trail may be closed during salmon spawning season (mid-August to mid-October). Check the “Attention Visitor Notice” for park alerts and updates prior to travel.
  • NOTE: When the Gwedats’ih Campground and boat launch are closed at the park boundary, please do not proceed beyond the fork in the road at the Tsylos Lodge as there is not room to turn a vehicle around at the Park gate.
  • Please note: A Bear Management Plan and Communications Strategy are being developed for Ts’ilʔos Park towards developing more efficient frontcountry campground operations during increased seasonal bear activities.
  • In order to meet budget targets, trail maintenance has been reduced on the Yohetta/Tzchaikazan Loop Trail in this park. Although this trail will remain open, users may encounter fallen trees and/or trail wash-outs. Extra caution is advised.

About This Park

Ts’ilʔos (pronounced “sigh-loss”) Provincial Park comprises approximately 233,000 hectares of rugged mountains, clear blue lakes, glaciers, alpine meadows, and waterfalls. It is bordered by the rugged peaks of the Coast Mountains to the west, and the dry Interior Plateau to the east. The diversity and contrast in landscapes and vegetation are a result of a rainshadow effect on the east side of the mountains. While the northern and eastern portions of the park are relatively dry, the south end of Chilko Lake is characterized by moist areas of the coastal western hemlock zone.

The provincial park was established in January of 1994 as a wilderness area set aside to protect vegetation, wildlife and fish habitats, cultural values, and special features. The diverse ecosystems in the park remain largely undisturbed by human activity, making this park an ecologically significant area in the province. Chilko Lake, the largest, natural high-elevation freshwater lake in Canada, dominates the park. Stunningly beautiful, due to its blue-green hues and dramatic mountain backdrops, Chilko Lake is popular with boaters, kayakers, and anglers. Backcountry hiking and camping is also a cornerstone of the recreational opportunities offered by this remote park.

Note: Ts’ilʔos Park is co-managed through a Memorandum of Understanding between BC Parks and the Xeni Gwet’in First Nations Government.
  • Campground operations are provided by the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation at both Nu Chugh Beniz and Gwedat’sih Campgrounds.
  • The Ts’ilʔos Ranger position is staffed through the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation and plays a crucial role in the day to day management of Ts’il?os Park through frontcountry and back country patrols, permit inspections, including providing support for campground operations.
Activities present in the area before the park’s creation, and still permitted today, include hunting, trapping, and cattle grazing. The historical importance of these uses is recognized, and there is a commitment in the Cariboo-Chilcotin Land-Use Plan to ensuring that such activities continue at existing levels.

Park Size: 233,240 hectares

Campground Dates of Operation
All dates are subject to change without notice
Opening and Closing Campground Dates: (campground is accessible but may not offer full services such as water, security, etc.) Year round
(Gate is open during the off-season)
Campground Dates with Full Services and Fees: May 15 – October 31 for both campgrounds
Campground Reservable Dates: Not applicable
Total Number of Vehicle Accessible Campsites: – Gwa da Ts’ih = 8 rustic
– Nu Chugh Beniz = 16
Number of Reservable Campsites, if applicable: (all remaining sites are first-come, first-served) Not applicable
Note: The above information is for the campground only. Park users can still walk into the park if conditions such as weather permit. Check the "Attention Visitor Notice" above for park alerts.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park is located in a relatively undeveloped and isolated part of the Chilcotin. As the crow flies, the park is approximately 160 km southwest of Williams Lake, or 250 km north of Vancouver. There are two main vehicle access routes into the park, and two campgrounds, one at the end of each route. Both routes take 4 – 6 hours from Williams Lake, though travel time varies considerably depending on weather conditions. Roads are rough, and conditions vary considerably. Drive carefully and with lights on. The nearest communities to the park are Nemiah Valley, Hanceville, Tatla Lake and Williams Lake.

No scheduled flights serve the park. Several airstrips are located outside the park boundary; a Park Use Permit is required for commercial air access within the park.

Topographical map numbers 1:50,000 92N/1, 92N/8, 92O/4, 92O/5, 92N/9, 92J/13 and 92K/16 cover the park. These are necessary for hikers, horseback riders and other backcountry travellers.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Master Plan for Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park [PDF 1.14MB].
  • Appendices for Ts’ilʔos Provincial Park Master Plan [PDF 948KB].
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Kayaking is popular on Chilko Lake. Canoeing on Chilko Lake is not recommended.
Climbing / Rapelling

Climbing

There are climbing opportunities available at the south end of Chilko Lake; however they are remote and hard to access.
Cycling

Cycling

The Ts’ilʔos Management Plan provides opportunities for mountain biking on designated roads and low elevation trails so that there is minimal impact on the environment or conflict with other users. Please see designated areas below:
Mountain Biking is permitted on:
  • The Yohetta Valley trail as far as the West end of Yohetta Lake (Olson’s Cabin)
  • Existing roads and as designated in the North Chilko Lake Unit
  • Existing roads in the Tsuniah Unit
  • Existing roads in the Tullin Unit
At all time horses and hikers have priority.

Mountain Biking is not permitted in the following areas:
  • Ts’ilʔos Unit
  • Lord River Unit
  • Stikelan South Unit
  • South Chilko Lake Unit
Please view the attached map for the different Ts’ilʔos Management Units. [PDF 266KB]
Fishing

Fishing

Fishing information. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.

Tsylos Park Lodge offers a number of recreational opportunities in this park (including horseback riding expeditions, hunting trips and flyfishing). Click here to view Tsylos Park Lodge’s web link, for additional information.
Hiking

Hiking

The backcountry of Ts’ilʔos Park is recommended for experienced travellers only who are equipped for trail finding, first aid, and survival situations. Hiking routes are not maintained and there are no facilities. Click here for Trail Information.
For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

There is horseback riding at this park, although trails are neither maintained nor marked.

Tsylos Park Lodge offers a number of recreational opportunities in this park (including horseback riding expeditions, hunting trips and flyfishing). Click here to view Tsylos Park Lodge’s web link, for additional information.
Hunting

Hunting

The park is open to hunting. Please refer to the British Columbia Hunting Regulations for more information. Tsylos Park Lodge offers a number of recreational opportunities in this park (including horseback riding expeditions, hunting trips and flyfishing). Click here to view Tzazati Mountain Outfitters web link, for additional information.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks. There is no developed sandy beach, and the water is very cold.
Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

It is possible to crosscountry ski and snowshoe in the park, however, there are no set trails.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

A concrete boat launch is available for trailerized boats at Gwa Da Ts’ih, while a natural launch, suitable for cartop boats, is located at Nu Chugh Beniz.
Campfires

Campfires

While campfires are allowed and campfire rings are provided at each campsite, we encourage visitors to conserve wood and protect the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using campstoves instead. Firewood can be purchased in the park or you may bring your own wood. Fees for firewood are set locally and may vary from park to park. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. To preserve vegetation and ground cover, please don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or elsewhere in the park (this is a ticketable offence under the Park Act). Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil.
Drinking Water

Drinking Water

Cold water pumps are found in the campgrounds.
Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park has a day-use/picnic area at Nu Chugh Beniz Campground only. There are a few picnic tables in this area. 
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

This park only has pit toilets located at the campground. There are no flush toilets.
Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

This park offers vehicle accessible campsites on a first-come, first-served basis – campsite reservations are not accepted. There is a variety of shaded, treed, and open sites at each campground and parking is available for extra vehicles. The Nu Chugh Beniz campground has 16 camp sites, 1 of which is a large pull through, 3 double, and the rest are single vehicle sites. There are also 4 tent pads at this campground. At the Gwa Da Ts’ih campground there are 8 single vehicle sites.

Gwa Da Ts’ih Campground: To reach this small, rustic campground at the north end of Chilko Lake, take Highway 20 to Tatla Lake, then drive 63 km on a gravel road from Tatla Lake to the Gwa Da Ts’ih campground. Follow signs for Chilko Lake. Lodges nearby may offer meals and some basic supplies.

Nu Chugh Beniz Campground: This very scenic but often windy campground on the east side of Chilko Lake is accessed via Highway 20 to Hanceville, then 121 km on gravel from Hanceville via Konni Lake and the Nemiah Valley. Supplies are available near the campground at the Nemiah Valley Tl’ebayi Community Centre: gas, propane, laundry and internet service.

These campgrounds run on a self registration system and drop boxes are in place so people can pay their overnight fee. There are no payphones at either campground.
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $11.00 per party / night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $5.50 per senior party/night. Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.

The closest store to the Nu Chugh Beniz campground is at Nemiah Valley Tl’ebayi Community Centre or at Hanceville. The closest store to the Gwa Da Ts’ih campground is at Tatla Lake.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wilderness, backcountry or walk-in camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.