Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park
Visitor Information
  • The entrance to Conover Cove is shallow at low tide and care must be exercised to avoid grounding. Boaters should approach the park with caution due to numerous reefs and shoals in the area.
Park Contact

K2 Park Services Ltd.
E-mail address: k2parks@shaw.ca
Phone/Fax: (250) 539-2115
Website: www.k2parks.ca

Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park

  • NOTICE: Potable drinking water is not provided in this park.

About This Park

Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park, located in beautiful Trincomali Channel between the northern ends of Saltspring Island and Galiano Island, is a popular destination for boaters and kayakers exploring the southern Gulf Islands.

The numerous beaches, coves and offshore islets provide plenty of sheltered paddling opportunities in this picturesque park, which is ideal for day trips from Vancouver Island and overnight camping. Bald eagles, black-tailed deer and mink are common in the park, as well as harbour seals, sea lions and river otters, which can often be spotted offshore.

This park has limited development, but offers opportunities for swimming, fishing, kayaking, wildlife viewing and hiking. Walking trails will take you throughout most of the park, providing views of the folded rock formations that compose the island. Facilities are limited to an information shelter, pit toilets, picnic tables and 18 walk-in campsites at the designated camping areas of Conover Point, Chivers Point and Cabin Bay. Campfires are not permitted. A small dock is available at Conover Cove, as well as an octagonal dingy dock at Princess Bay. Sheltered anchorage and stern tie rings are available in Conover Cove and Princess Bay.

Park Size: 72 hectares

Special Notes:
  • Please do not discharge sewage or grey water while moored here – it is against park regulations.
  • Boaters should not tie up at the portion of the dock reserved for BC Parks staff.
  • There are two private properties on the island. Please respect them.
  • Vessels longer than 11 metres (36 feet) are asked not to use the dock for tie-up.
Reservations are not accepted at this park, all campsites are on a first-come, first-served basis.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park is only accessible by boat. This park lies in Trincomali Channel between Galiano Island and the northern tip of Saltspring Island, off southern Vancouver Island. Boats can enter the sheltered anchorages at Princess Bay and Conover Cove from Houston Channel. Boaters can reference marine chart #3442 and #3463 for more information on this area. Nearby communities include: Galiano Island, Saltspring Island, Victoria, Nanaimo, Duncan.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
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Nature and Culture

  • History: This island, originally charted as “Narrow Island”, was named after Capt. Wallace Houstoun, who first surveyed the area in the 1850s. Twisted fruit trees mark the remnants of the garden and orchard planted by Jeremiah Chivers, a Scotsman who retired here after unsuccessful adventures in the interior gold rushes. Chivers lived alone on the island, never marrying, and died here in 1927 at the age of 92.

    After the Second World War, David Conover purchased the island and moved here with his wife Jeanne. The couple developed a very successful holiday resort on Wallace Island, and Conover became a successful author, writing four books - “Once Upon An Island”, “One Man’s Island”, “Sitting On A Saltspring” and “Finding Marilyn, A Resource”. In the first two books he described the couple’s struggles and joys after their purchase of the land in 1946. Their resort, the Royal Cedar Cottages, was advertised as having “a modern well-stocked store, cabins, recreation hall and boat rentals.” In the mid to late 1960’s, Conover sold the majority of the island to a group of teachers from Seattle. Disagreements among the owners led to court proceedings and the property was again put up for sale. Wallace Island was purchased through the court ordered sale and became a provincial marine park in 1990 through the cooperative efforts of the provincial government and BC Marine Parks Forever.
  • Conservation: The flora of this island is typical of many of the Gulf Islands – with dry summers, many plants are adapted to germinate and grow in the winter, flower in early spring and become dormant by early summer. The best time for botanical viewing is March through May.
  • Wildlife: Black-tailed deer are the largest land animals in the park. Sightings of river otters, mink and harbour seals are common. Sea lions can be found in the area in winter, but disappear during the height of the breeding season in July and August. The number of Bald eagles has greatly increased in the area in the last 30 years and are now frequently sighted. Bird watching here is most productive in the spring, winter and fall.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
  • Online Management planning information for this park is not available at this time.
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Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park is a popular stopover and destination point for paddlers. Paddlers can launch from Saltspring Island, Galiano Island and a number of other Vancouver Island locations, including Duncan and Ladysmith. Be prepared for potentially strong currents and unpredictable weather in this area.
Fishing

Fishing

The park is surrounded by ocean waters and provides saltwater fishing opportunities, subject to periodic closures.

Rockfish Conservation Areas occur within this park. Fishing activities are limited in Rockfish Conservation Areas. Before you go fishing please refer to the Rockfish Conservation Area descriptions available from Fisheries and Oceans (DFO).
Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.
Hiking

Hiking

A series of fairly flat, well-maintained walking/hiking trails travel throughout the park, providing views of the folded rock formations that compose the island. Head south to Panther Point, named after the Panther, a ship that ran aground here in 1874. A trail also leads partway out to the point at Princess Cove, as well as one that leads to Chivers Point at the northwest end of the park. An information shelter at the head of the wharf at Conover Cove offers more details on walking routes.
For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or park buildings. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Swimming

Swimming

There is no designated swimming area at this park. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

A picnic shelter and open grass fields offer day-use opportunities at Conover Cove.
Docking facilities are located at Conover Cove, as well as stern tie rings at both Conover Cove and Princess Cove. Anchorage is available in Conover Cove and Princess Cove. When anchoring, please ensure you are not blocking stern tie rings or access to and from the docks. The entrance to Conover Cove is shallow at low tide and care must be exercised to avoid grounding. Boaters should not tie up at the portion of the dock reserved for BC Parks staff.
Dock Facilities Use Fee: $2.00 per metre / night
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit toilets are located at Conover Cove and Chivers Point.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park has 3 designated walk-in camping areas: Conover Cove – approximately 8 open field sites, Chivers Point – 9 tent pad sites, Cabin Bay – 1 tent pad site. Chivers Point and Cabin Bay are ideal for kayak camping.
Fees apply for overnight camping and are payable at self registration vaults.

Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics. Garbage facilities are not provided; visitors must pack out all of their garbage.

Please ensure you camp and hike in designated areas. Human disturbance of the vegetation leads to erosion of the sensitive shoreline and the potential destruction of archeological sites.

Wallace Island Marine Provincial Park is open year round.

Backcountry Camping Fee: $5.00 per person / night for all persons 6 years of age or older.
BC Parks Backcountry Registration System allows you to pre-pay your overnight fees for backcountry and/or marine site usage, where designated. This system will not be used for vehicle accessible (ie front country) campgrounds or controlled back country permits (ie Bowron Lakes canoe circuit and Berg Lake Trail).
Backcountry Registration System