Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Please Note: During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin [PDF 79KB].
Activites and Facilities Available in this Park - Click icon to view
Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

White Ridge Provincial Park

Know Before You Go

White-Nose Syndrome
White-nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that has been linked to the mass die-off of hibernating bats in Eastern North America – it poses a significant threat to bats of the west and British Columbia. There is evidence that humans have accelerated the spread through entering caves with contaminated clothing, gear or equipment. Therefore, prevention strategies are focussed on public education/awareness to prevent the introduction of the fungus through human activities. There are currently (JUNE 2011) no reported cases of WNS in BC.

To ensure the protection of bats and their habitat in this park, BC Parks strongly advises that personal caving gear that has been used anywhere east of the Rockies not be used in BC. Also, before entering caves in BC, cavers and visitors should consult the provincial WNS website, which includes a link to a Decontamination Protocol for Mines and Caves.
http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/plants-animals-ecosystems/wildlife/wildlife-health/wildlife-diseases/white-nose-syndrome

About This Park

White Ridge Provincial Park forms the backdrop for the quaint village of Gold River, on the west coast of northern Vancouver Island. The name of the park is derived from the white limestone and karst topography for which the area is internationally known.

The park’s karst surfaces – a distinctive topography in which the landscape is largely shaped by the dissolving action of water on carbonate bedrock, usually limestone, dolomite or marble – are significant and easy to see. White Ridge also features an extensive cave system and protects important deer and Roosevelt elk habitat. Although there may be potential for caving opportunities in the future, this area is sensitive and use is not recommended until a management plan is complete.

Date Established: July 12, 1995

Park Size: 1,356 hectares

Special Notes:
  • Karst topography is easily damaged. Please use caution in this sensitive area. Do not damage or remove any rock formations or features from the caves.
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Location and Maps

Please note: Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation. White Ridge Park extends from the boundary of Strathcona Provincial Park northwest to the Gold River Highway corridor. The park is located 4 km west of Gold River and is accessed off Gold River Highway 28 via the BR 80 logging road.

Maps and Brochures

Any maps listed are for information only – they may not represent legal boundaries and should not be used for navigation.
  • There is no digitized map/brochure available for this park.
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Nature and Culture

  • Conservation: White Ridge Park includes a prominent mid-elevation forested ridge which forms the eastern viewscape of the community of Gold River. The park also protects important deer and elk habitat and a system of caves. The name of the park is derived from the white limestone and karst topography, for which the area is internationally known.
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Management Planning

Management Planning Information
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Activities Available at this Park

Caving

Caving

White Ridge Provincial Park is known for its extensive cave system. Most caves are suitable for experienced cavers only. Although there may be potential for caving opportunities in the future, this area is sensitive and use is not recommended until a management plan is complete.

White-nose Syndrome
White-nose Syndrome is a fungal disease that has been linked to mass die-off of hibernating bats in North America – it poses a significant threat to colonies in British Columbia. Please read the White Nose Syndrome fact sheet [PDF 552.76KB] to understand the disease, how to limit it's spread, and find out what cavers and park visitors can do to help.

Hiking

Hiking

There are no developed trails at this park. User-created routes do exist into and through the park. They are often unmarked and steep, exposed and very rough. Use caution when hiking on these routes.
Hunting

Hunting

Portions of this park are open to hunting for specific species. Hunters must have valid licences and tags. Please refer to the current Hunting and Trapping Regulations and Synopsis publication for closures and regulations.
Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be under control all times. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Dogs are not permitted in caves.Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.
Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

The cave system, significant surface karst features and old-growth forest provide ample opportunities for interesting viewing at this park.
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Facilities Available at this Park

Campfires

Campfires

While fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. If you must use a campfire, please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

There are no designated campsites at this park, however random wilderness camping is allowed. No facilities are provided. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.
Winter Camping

Winter Camping

White Ridge Provincial Park is open year round, however access roads may become snowbound in the winter.