Parks Use Permit Information

As part of the Ministry of Environment, BC Parks uses Park Use Permits to authorize use of land within the provincial parks and protected areas system for many types of commercial use, land use/land occupancy, filming and research activities. Ecological reserves use ecological reserve permits to authorize research and educational activities.

A Park Use Permit authorizes an individual, group, or organization to carry out a specific activity and outlines the specific conditions under which the proposed activity may occur. Park Use Permits help to manage activities within the protected areas system and minimize any impacts by requiring permit holders to follow conditions, and by limiting activities to appropriate times and places within the parks system as guided by Park Management Plans.

BC Parks is posting information online on permit applications and issued park use permits to inform the public of decisions made to authorize uses within the provincial parks system. The information provided is intended to inform the public on what activities are being managed under park use permits. For more information please see the Public Notification and Engagement Policy.

Permit applications are subject to review under the BC Parks Impact Assessment Process, and any impacts identified as part of this review will be considered when making a decision to issue a park use permit. Applications are also reviewed to ensure consistency with approved Management Plans, as these plans provide guidance for management of the specific park, protected area, recreation area or conservancy, and were developed through consultation with stakeholders and the general public. First Nations are also consulted to ensure that proposed park use permits will not adversely impact aboriginal rights or title.

In many of our parks pre-existing uses have been ‘grandfathered’ and are allowed to continue under park use permits. Decisions may also be made to allow new activities within parks, such as filming, guiding (commercial recreation) or research. Some Protected Areas that are established by an Order in Council under the Environment and Land Use Act allow for activities that are not normally authorized under the Park Act. For example, the Lac du Bois Grasslands Protected Area was established by Order in Council and allowed for the City of Kamloops to construct a water storage facility for the city.

If you have any questions, please contact: