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Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

Trapping in British Columbia

Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis 2012 - 2014 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis – Complete [PDF 37.62MB]

Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis

The Hunting and Trapping Synopsis is a summary of the B.C. hunting and trapping regulations made under the Wildlife Act (British Columbia), prepared for the convenience of hunters and trappers.

The section pertaining to trapping is found at:


Use Of Road-kill Wildlife By Trappers

Trappers with valid trapping licences, valid trapping permits, or persons exempted from holding licences or permits to trap fur bearing animals are now able to pick up certain species of wildlife that have died as a result of collisions with motor vehicles and to use the carcasses as bait for traps set under the authority of their trapping licence, permit, or exemption.

Trappers may pick up and transport any dead mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, moose, black bear, or any wildlife listed in Schedules B or C (see the Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis for current schedules) if:

  1. if the wildlife has died as a result of colliding with a motor vehicle, other than a motor vehicle operated by the trapper;
  2. the meat of the wildlife is unfit for human consumption;
  3. the carcass of the wildlife is to be used only:
    1. by the trapper, and
    2. as bait for traps set under the authority of the trapper’s licence or licence exemption; and
  4. at the time of possession and transportation, the trapper has, on his or her person, the trapper’s current trapping licence or proof of the trapper’s licence exemption.

Trappers that pick up road-kill wildlife for use as bait must, within 30 days of picking up the road kill, must complete a Trapper Road Kill Possession Report Form [PDF 50KB] and submit it to the address shown on the form.

Trappers must maintain a copy of every completed Trapper Road Kill Report Form for at least 2 years after the date of pick up of the road kill described on the form.

For more information on this regulation, please e-mail the Ministry of Environment Wildlife Policy Analyst at: Felice.Griffiths@gov.bc.ca

Compulsory Reporting and Inspection of Furbearers

Compulsory Reporting

Trappers must report, within 15 days following the end of the trapping season, the capture of:

  1. a wolverine in regions 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7
  2. a lynx in regions 4 and 8
  3. a bobcat in M.U.’s 1-14 and 1-15, and in regions 2, 4, and 8
  4. a wolf in regions 1 and 4
  5. a fisher in all M.U.’s when trapped in a fisher open season

Compulsory Inspection

Furbearers that are killed incidentally in areas with no open season are required to be compulsory inspected. Trappers must submit, within 15 days following the end of the trapping season, the carcass of:

  1. a wolverine in regions 1, 2, and 8
  2. a fisher in all M.U.’s when trapped outside a fisher open season
  3. a weasel in region 1, and in M.U.’s 6-12 and 6-13
  4. a long-tailed weasel in M.U.’s 2-03, 2-04, 2-06, 2-18 and 2-19
  5. a lynx in M.U.’s 1-14 and 1-15, and in region 2

Animals that are submitted may not be reclaimed by the trapper but may be donated by the Ministry of Environment to the Trapper Education Program.

The responsibility for managing the fur resources of British Columbia is shared between the Ministry of Environment (MOE and licenced trappers. The Management Guidelines for Furbearers series began in 1988 to provide trappers with a source that would allow them to properly manage their fur harvests. Guidelines currently exist in PDF for:

Management Guidelines outline the roles that trappers can play in the wise management of these important species.
Management Guidelines outline the roles that trappers can play in the wise management of these important species.
Management Guidelines outline the roles that trappers can play in the wise management of these important species.
Management Guidelines outline the roles that trappers can play in the wise management of these important species.

The Registered Trapline System gives each trapper the ability to manage species on his or her line. These Guidelines instruct the trapper on techniques that will ensure populations remain productive and healthy. Management guidelines contain current figures, statistics, and information on species biology and management, as well as up-to-date recommendations regarding such management techniques as habitat enhancement, use of untrapped refuges, avoidance of non-target captures, and monitoring of population levels to allow trappers to adjust their harvest accordingly. Harvest strategies for furbearers are developed by staff of the Fish and Wildlife Branch but proper management requires the full cooperation and support from trappers to be successful.

Fur Royalty Regulations and Schedule

Royalty must be paid by a person to keep the pelt or skin of a furbearing animal (not raised in captivity) lawfully taken under their Trapping licence, unless that person sells the pelt or skin to a licensed fur trader.

Royalty fee payments may be submitted by mail or courier with a cheque, money order (payable to the Minister of Finance) or credit card to Permit and Authorization Service Bureau, 4th Floor 2975 Jutland Road, PO Box 9372 STN PROV GOVT, Victoria, BC, V8W 9M3 or by fax: 250-387-1814.

If the pelt or skin of a furbearing animal was lawfully taken under a person's hunting licence, a royalty does not need to be paid, unless that person intends to offer the pelt or skin for sale.

Schedule of Royalties

Royalty per pelt or skin:
Species
Royalties 2013
Beaver
$0.82
Black Bear
$4.26
Bobcat
$8.89
Coyote
$1.42
Fisher
$2.95
Fox
$1.27
Lynx
$4.05
Marten
$2.68
Mink
$0.73
Muskrat
$0.22
Otter
$2.61
Racoon
$0.30
Skunk
$0.15
Squirrel
$0.03
Weasel
$0.11
Wolf
$3.66
Wolverine
$7.57