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Ministry of Environment

Frogwatching

Pacific Tree Frog (Hyla regilla)

First of all, thank you for deciding to be a Citizen Scientist and helping B.C. Frogwatch! Every observation is important. Amphibians have been assessed as the most at risk vertebrate taxa globally. In B.C. greater than 50% of all amphibian and reptile species are assessed as being of conservation concern from a variety of threats including habitat degradation, loss of wetland, road mortality, and emerging diseases. Information contributed by Citizen Scientists on the distribution and abundance of these species will alert us to declining trends or loss of certain species, identify areas of high conservation concern or value for protection, implement mitigation measures to reduce road mortality and other conservation measures, and promote herpetofaunal conservation in general.

In spite of its name, BC Frogwatch collects information on all Herpetofauna (frogs, toads, salamanders, snakes, lizards, and turtles). There are two ways in which you can contribute information to BC Frogwatch:

  1. Incidental Observations
  2. Site Based, Long-Term Monitoring

Increased knowledge about amphibians will improve the accuracy of your observations. You can learn how to identify amphibians by visiting our Who’s Who page, where you can look at a list of frogs, toads, and salamanders in your region, read fact sheets about them, use the step by step identification key, and listen to frog and toad calls. The BC Reptiles website maintained by the Thompson Rivers University provides information on reptile identification and natural history much like the BC Frogwatch website provides information on BC Amphibians.

Please be careful while you are out Frogwatching – read our Safety Tips.

Photo © Russ Haycock. No reproduction or distribution without permission.